Fellows

SEGH launches Fellow membership level.

The board of SEGH recently created a new level of membership: Fellow. This is an invitation-only membership level, and reflects the fact that the individual concerned has been very active within SEGH, or within the field which SEGH represents.

In May this year, the board considered and approved twenty-five nominations for the Fellow membership. Many of these have accepted. The membership level will be launched at the conference in July in Manchester, where we hope that many of them will be able to join us.

Some of the Fellows will be joining our team of mentors for the first time. It is nearly a year since our mentee scheme for Early Career Researchers (ECRs) was launched in Africa. We hope that many of the first cohort of Fellows and ECRs will be able to join us again in Manchester, and help to support new members.

Do you know someone who you think should be a Fellow? If so, please write to the board, (seghsecretary@gmail.com) suggesting why you think this should be the case, providing some background to this person. The board will then consider the proposal, and make an invitation to that person, if appropriate.

Watch this space: we will be introducing the Fellows to you on the website.

 

Our Fellows:

Alex Stewart


Alex Stewart

Alex Stewart is a medical doctor with extensive experience at the interface between health and the environment. He worked in Pakistan for 20 years then in the UK Public Health service until his retirement. He volunteers in his village and tries to fit in some academic writing and preaching.

Gillian Gibson


Gillian Gibson, MSc CEnv FIEMA

Gillian is an Environmental Scientist working in the wider arena of impact assessment and sustainability, both locally in the UK, and internationally. She is a registered environmental auditor, as well as being a highly respected trainer.

Gillian has run her own consultancy and training company for eighteen years, following thirty years work in the public and private sectors, as well as the education sector.

Shu Tao


Dr. Shu Tao

Dr. Shu Tao is a professor in College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University. He is a member of Chinese Academy of Science and a member of National Steering Committee on Environmental Protection. He serves as Associate Editor of Environmental Science & Technology. His current research interests include global emission inventories of various air pollutants, atmospheric transport and population exposure modeling, and household air quality. He has more than 200 papers published in peer-reviewed international journals with total citation over 16,000 and H-index (Web of Science) of 70.

 


Paula Marinho Reis

Paula Marinho Reis is Assistant Professor of Environmental Geology at the University of Minho, Braga, Portugal. Her main subjects of interest are environmental geochemistry and health, human exposure, health risk assessment, human biomonitoring, and urban geochemistry. Her latest research is on indoor dust and potential exposure to potentially toxic elements.

 


Professor Ming Hung Wong

Professor Ming Hung Wong is Editor-in-Chief of EGAH. He has been awarded a DSc Degree each, by University of Durham and University of Strathclyde in 1992 and 2004, respectively. He is one of the 3160 highly cited researchers (all disciplines) around the world, with H-index>100 (Ranking Web of Universities). http://www.webometrics.info/en/hlargerthan100

 


Anthea Brown, BA, BSc, FGS

SEGH Membership Secretary & Treasurer

I worked at the British Geological Survey from 1989 on the Geochemical Survey Programme in Wales; then I managed BGS Enquiries until retirement. I joined SEGH in 1990 and with my late husband, Malcolm, organised SEGH1994 conference at BGS, Keyworth and we were heavily involved in SEGH1997 along with Pat O’Connor at the Geological Survey of Ireland in Dublin.  I have enjoyed many SEGH conferences since then especially Zambia in 2018.

 


Michael Watts

Michael Watts is Head of Inorganic Geochemistry at the British Geological Survey and is an Associate Professor with the University of Nottingham through the joint Centre for Environmental Geochemistry. His research interests on geochemistry and ‘health’ interactions employs analytical chemistry for research on pollution pathways via ‘natural’ or anthropogenic geochemical sources and mineral nutrient dynamics in soil-crop-human/animal systems. Increasingly the research is multidisciplinary with greater emphasis towards challenges and partnerships in developing countries. Michael is currently the President for SEGH.

https://www.bgs.ac.uk/staff/profiles/4583.html

 


Jane Entwistle

Jane Entwistle is Associate Pro Vice Chancellor (Research) in the Faculty of Engineering and Environment, Northumbria University, Newcastle, UK, and Professor of Applied Geochemistry and Health. Her involvement in environmental geochemistry has developed over the years with a recent and on-going focus on the bioavailability and bioaccessibility of potentially harmful elements (PHEs) in the urban environment, working to promote evidence-informed policy-making in human health risk assessment. Current projects include research to advance our understanding of the environmental hazards posed by indoor dust (https://www.360dustanalysis.com - a global research initiative to get baseline data on harmful chemicals in regular households).

 


Dr. Chaosheng Zhang

Dr. Chaosheng Zhang works at National University of Ireland, Galway. His research focuses on spatial analyses of environmental variables, especially metals and nutrients in soils and soil organic carbon, using GIS, geostatistics and other spatial statistical techniques, to identify hotspots and quantify spatial variation, providing scientific bases for environmental management and precision agriculture.

 


Sanja Potgieter-Vermaak

Sanja Potgieter-Vermaak is a Senior Lecturer in Analytical Chemistry at Manchester Metropolitan University in Manchester, UK. She heads the environmental change research group in the Ecology and Environmental Research Centre at MMU. Her research focus is on the health effects of air pollution (using various in-vitro techniques) and she has expertise in the monitoring and chemical characterisation of airborne particles for different geochemical origins, as well as indoor environments. The emphasis is specifically on the inhalable size fraction (using novel techniques e.g. InSEM-Raman) and source apportionment of transition metals. Dr. Potgieter-Vermaak published 91 papers in prestigious journals for e.g. STOTEN, Atmospheric Environment and Environment International. She has been the lead researcher in air pollution monitoring and characterisation projects in Belgium and produced several reports on the findings.

 


Alecos Demetriades

Alecos is an applied geochemist with considerable experience in mineral exploration and environmental geochemical surveys.  Worked for Rio Tinto Finance and Exploration Ltd and the Hellenic Institute of Geology and Mineral Exploration. Presently holds the post of treasurer to the IUGS Commission on Global Geochemical Baselines, and chair of the Sampling Committee.

 


Aradhana Mehra

Aradhana’s academic expertise lies in the area of toxic trace elements in the environment and their human health implications. Currently, as Head of the Research and Enterprise Training Institute at the University of Greenwich, she has responsibility for the postgraduate research student training and progression, as well as professional training for early career, mid and established research staff

 


Dr Mark Cave

Dr Mark Cave is a senior scientist at the British Geological Survey with extensive experience in the interpretation of environmental data related to geochemistry and human health. He has developed a sequential extraction methodology for the solid phase fractionation of potentially harmful elements in soils using a chemometric modelling technique. He is chairman of BARGE (Bioaccessibility Research Group of Europe), who have developed an ISO method for bioaccessibility testing of metals and metalloids in soil. He has wide experience in investigating the geological controls on the bioaccessibility of As, Pb and polyaromatic hydrocarbons in soils.

 


Prof. Taicheng An

Distinguished Professor, Director of Institute of Environmental Health and Pollution Control, Guangdong University of Technology (GDUT), China. He was selected as most cited Chinese authors in Environmental Sciences by Elsevier’s Scopus from 2014 to 2018 with continuous five years. He is winner of NSFC for Distinguished Young Scholars in China, Distinguished Professor of Chang Jiang Scholars of MOE as well as the Pearl River Scholars Program of Guangdong Province, and Young Scientist Winner of Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment.

 


Professor Andrew B. Cundy, FGS, FRGS

Andy is Professor of Environmental Radioactivity and Director of Internationalisation in Ocean and Earth Science, University of Southampton, at the National Oceanography Centre (Southampton). He has over 25 years research experience in the environmental cycling and behaviour of aquatic and terrestrial pollutants (metal, organic, plastic and radioactive contaminants), environmental radioactivity and radiochemistry, environmental geology, contaminated land, wastes and water management, nanoscience and nanotechnology, and development of novel, more sustainable, materials for environmental and engineering applications.

Web home page: https://www.southampton.ac.uk/oes/about/staff/ac3f14.page

 


Andrew Hursthouse

Andrew Hursthouse serves as a Professor of environmental geochemistry in the School of Computing, Engineering & Physical Sciences at the University of the West of Scotland, Scotland (UWS). His research interests include the environmental geochemistry of metallic elements and persistent organic pollutants; analytical/environmental chemistry; environmental pollution, resources, and implications for human health; environmental protection and legislation, impact of industrial processes. 

• Chair local organising committees, SEGH2005, April 2005, Paisley; SEGH2009, Dublin (with ISEE), June 2009,  

• Chair European Section of SEGH, 2008-2011.

• President of SEGH 2013-15.

https://research-portal.uws.ac.uk/en/persons/andrew-hursthouse

 


Prof Mike Ramsey

Prof Mike Ramsey joined SEGH in the 1980s whist a staff member of the Environmental Geochemistry Research Group at Imperial College, before moving to the University of Sussex in 1999. He’s published over 160 papers and supervised 23 PhD students, generally in analytical environmental geochemistry, and was Chair of European SEGH from 2005-2008.

 


Professor Xiang-dong Li

Professor Xiang-dong Li is the Director of Research Institute of Sustainable Urban Development, Chair Professor of Environmental Science and Technology at Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Associate Dean (Research) of Faculty of Construction and Environment, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. He obtained his BSc in Earth Sciences and his MSc in Geochemistry from Nanjing University, and his PhD in Environmental Technology from Imperial College London.

Prof. Li’s major research interests include regional pollution, urban environmental studies, and remediation of contaminated soils. He has published more than 200 papers in leading international journals, and is one of the highly cited researchers in Environment/Ecology of the Web of Science database. He was awarded the Outstanding Young Researcher (Oversea) Fund from the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) in 2007.

Professor Li is the past president (2011-2013) of the International Society of Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH). He is currently an Associate Editor for Environmental Science and Technology (ES&T). Prof. Li is also an associate editor and editorial board member for several other international journals in related research fields.

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Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Health risks and source identification of dietary exposure to indicator polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in Lanzhou, China 2019-09-19

    Abstract

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are widely present in multiple environmental media even long after the phaseout, posing a health risk to the general population. Dietary intake is the major exposure route of PCBs; however, information is limited regarding PCBs in food that people directly consume. This study aims to measure personal exposure to indicator PCBs, evaluate the health risks, and identify their sources in a typical metropolitan city in China. Multi-day food samples were collected from 21 subjects in Lanzhou, Gansu Province, in two seasons using the duplicate plate method. Samples were extracted and analyzed for seven indicator PCBs using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Average daily doses (ADDs) of ∑7PCBs were estimated using Monte Carlo analysis with food intake information. Results show that PCB-118 and PCB-180 were the major congeners in food samples with average concentrations of 1.42 and 1.11 ng/g, respectively. The average (± SD) ADD of ∑7PCBs was 26.47 ± 22.10 ng/kg day among adults aged 18–69 years and displayed small variation across age groups. Comparing with the chronic RfD of 7 ng/kg day, 67% of people had their ADDs exceeding this threshold. The median cancer risk was 5.52 × 10−5, and 51% of residents had risks exceeding the action level of 10−4. The principal component analysis identified waste incineration, gasoline engine production, and leakage of #1 PCBs as the major PCBs sources. In conclusion, a large portion of Lanzhou residents has high non-cancer and cancer risks from dietary exposure to PCBs, which warrants control actions targeting these major sources.

  • Comprehensive assessment of heavy metals pollution of farmland soil and crops in Jilin Province 2019-09-18

    Abstract

    As a major agricultural province in China, it is necessary to study the content of heavy metals in farmland soil and crop in Jilin Province and to evaluate the risks to ecology and human health. This study presented the work completed on 79 soil samples, 10 rice samples, 66 maize samples and 15 soybean samples collected from Jilin Province farmland and evaluated six heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd, Hg and As) concentrations. The results showed that the concentrations of the six heavy metals in farmland soil and crop samples from Jilin Province basically met the soil standards and food health standards of China. The agricultural soil pollution spatial distribution was the most serious in the south of Jilin Province and the lightest in the west. The non-carcinogenic risks faced by children eating crops were higher than those of adults, but the carcinogenic risks were lower than those of adults. Both of the two health risks to adults and children from eating crops were very limited. The results would help determine the heavy metals pollution in farmland soil in Jilin Province efficiently and accurately and helped decision makers to achieve a balance between production and environmental regulation.

  • Sustainability of agricultural and wild cereals to aerotechnogenic exposure 2019-09-14

    Abstract

    In recent decades, the problem of the constantly increasin level of anthropogenic load on the environment is becoming more and more acute. Some of the most dangerous pollutants entering the environment from industrial emissions are heavy metals. These pollutants are not susceptible to biodegradation over time, which leads to their accumulation in the environment in dangerous concentrations. The purpose of this work is to study the sustainability of cultivated and wild plants of the Poaceae family to aerotechnogenic pollution in the soil. The content of heavy metals in couch grass (Elytrigia repens (L.) Nevski), meadow bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) and soft wheat (Triticum aestivum) plants grown in the impact zone of Novocherkassk Power Station has been analyzed. Contamination of cultivated and wild cereals with Pb, Zn, Ni and Cd has been established. It has been shown that the accumulation of heavy metals is individual for each plant species. An average and close correlation have been established between the total HM content and the content of their mobile forms in the soil and their content in plants. For the plants studied, the translocation factor (TF) and the distribution coefficient (DC) of HM have been calculated. The TF is formed by the ratio of the concentration of an element in the root plant dry weight to the content of its mobile compounds in the soil. The DC value makes it possible to estimate the capacity of the aboveground parts of plants to absorb and accumulate elements under soil pollution conditions and is determined as the ratio of the metal content in the aboveground biomass to its concentration in the roots. TF and DC values have shown a significant accumulation of elements by plants from the soil, as well as their translocation from the root system to the aboveground part. It has been revealed that even within the same Poaceae family, cultural species are more sensitive to man-made pollution than wild-growing ones.