About

Diverse scientific fields and multidisciplinary expertise brought together within an international community

About SEGH

 

SEGH was established in 1971 to provide a forum for scientists from various disciplines to work together in understanding the interaction between the geochemical environment and the health of plants, animals, and humans.

SEGH recognizes the importance of interdisciplinary research, representing expertise in a diverse range of scientific fields, such as biology, engineering, geology, hydrology, epidemiology, chemistry, medicine, nutrition, and toxicology.

SEGH members come from a variety of backgrounds within the academic, regulatory, and industrial communities, thus providing a representative perspective on current issues and concerns.

SEGH membership is international and there are regional sections to coordinate activities in Europe, Americas and Asia/ Pacific.

 

 

 

Organisational Profile

 

President and Regional Chairs: President Professor Andrew Hursthouse

President European Chair Americas Chair Asia/Pacific Chair
Prof. Andrew Hursthouse Prof. Andrew Hursthouse Prof. Andrew Hunt Prof. Kyoung-Woong Kim
University of West Scotland University of West Scotland   Korea
andrew.hursthouse.uws.ac.uk andrew.hursthouse@uws.ac.uk   kwkim@gist.ac.kr

 

 

Organisational roles

Membership Secretary / Treasurer Secretary Webmaster
Mrs Anthea Brown Mr Malcolm Brown Dr Michael Watts
Rt. British Geological Survey Rt. British Geological Survey British Geological Survey
seghmembership@gmail.com segh.secretary@gmail.com seghwebmaster@gmail.com

 

SEGH is a member of the Geological Society of America's Associated Society Partnerships.  For more information on educational programmes, collaborations and communications link to www.geosociety.org.

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SEGH Events

SEGH 2015 31st International Conference

Bratislava

22 June 2015

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Members can keep in touch with their colleagues through short news and events articles of interest to the SEGH community.

Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • A gradient of mercury concentrations in Scottish single malt whiskies 2015-04-18

    Abstract

    Mercury (Hg) concentrations were measured in 26 Scottish single malt whiskies, and all found to be very low (<10 ng L−1), posing no threat to human health through reasonable levels of consumption. However, a significant south-to-north declining gradient in Hg concentrations was observed reflecting that reported for atmospheric deposition. We speculate that this gradient could be due to a combination of contemporary deposition and the legacy of industrial mercury emissions and deposition over the last 200 years affecting concentrations in local waters used in whisky production. As UK atmospheric emissions of mercury have declined by 90 % since the 1970s, we suggest that whisky being produced today should have even lower Hg concentrations when consumed in 10- to 15-years time. This reduction may be compromised by the remobilisation of contaminants stored in catchment soils being transferred to source waters, but is very unlikely to raise the negligible health risk due to Hg from Scottish single malt whisky consumption.

  • Arsenic hazard in Cambodian rice from a market-based survey with a case study of Preak Russey village, Kandal Province 2015-04-17

    Abstract

    This study comprises a market-based survey to assess the arsenic (As) hazard of Cambodian rice, encompassing rice from seven Cambodian provinces, comparisons with rice imported from China, Vietnam and Thailand, and assessments of 15 rice varieties. Rice samples (n = 157) were collected from four large markets in Kandal Province and analysed for As using inductively coupled mass spectrometry. The mean As concentration for Cambodian rice (0.185 µg g−1, range 0.047–0.771 µg g−1) was higher than that for imported rice from Vietnam and Thailand (0.162 and 0.157 µg g−1, respectively) with mean As concentrations highest in rice from Prey Veng Province resulting in a daily dose of 1.77 µg kg−1 b.w. (body weight) d−1. Between unmilled rice varieties, Cambodian-grown White Sticky Rice had the highest mean As concentration (0.234 µg g−1), whilst White Sticky Rice produced in Thailand had the lowest (0.125 µg g−1), suggesting that localised conditions have greater bearing over rice As concentrations than differences in As uptake between individual varieties themselves. A rice and water consumption survey for 15 respondents in the village of Preak Russey revealed mean consumption rates of 522 g d−1 of rice and 1.9 L d−1 of water. At water As concentrations >1000 µg L−1, the relative contribution to the daily dose from rice is low. When water As concentrations are lowered to 50 µg L−1, daily doses from rice and water are both generally below the 3.0 µg kg−1 b.w. d−1 benchmark daily limit for a 0.5 % increase in lung cancer, yet when combined they exceeded this value in all but three respondents.

  • Ambient air particulates and particulate-bound mercury Hg(p) concentrations: dry deposition study over a Traffic, Airport, Park (T.A.P.) areas during years of 2011–2012 2015-04-10

    Abstract

    The main purpose of this study was to monitor ambient air particles and particulate-bound mercury Hg(p) in total suspended particulate (TSP) concentrations and dry deposition at the Hung Kuang (Traffic), Taichung airport and Westing Park sampling sites during the daytime and nighttime, from 2011 to 2012. In addition, the calculated/measured dry deposition flux ratios of ambient air particles and particulate-bound mercury Hg(p) were also studied with Baklanov & Sorensen and the Williams models. For a particle size of 10 μm, the Baklanov & Sorensen model yielded better predictions of dry deposition of ambient air particulates and particulate-bound mercury Hg(p) at the Hung Kuang (Traffic), Taichung airport and Westing Park sampling site during the daytime and nighttime sampling periods. However, for particulates with sizes 20–23 μm, the results obtained in the study reveal that the Williams model provided better prediction results for ambient air particulates and particulate-bound mercury Hg(p) at all sampling sites in this study.