SEGH Articles

Environmental Geochemistry Health: on-line access

01 January 2012
Environmental Geochemistry and Health is now available to via on-line access to members (Full and Student). Log in through www.segh.net to access the Springer back catalogue of EGH.

 

Environmental Geochemistry and Health is now available on-line to Full and Student members.  Please note that this does not include members that did not select the EGH on-line access option.   Ensure that you have selected the correct payment criteria for EGH on-line access (Full and Student membership).

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  • You will be directed to the Springer website where you will be able to access the back catalogue of EGH.

 

Springer offer free institutional access to their journals to academic institutions in developing countries.  See www.springer.com for terms and conditions.

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Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Spatial variability and geochemistry of rare earth elements in soils from the largest uranium–phosphate deposit of Brazil 2018-02-22

    Abstract

    The Itataia uranium–phosphate deposit is the largest uranium reserve in Brazil. Rare earth elements (REEs) are commonly associated with phosphate deposits; however, there are no studies on the concentrations of REEs in soils of the Itataia deposit region. Thus, the objective of the research was to evaluate the concentration and spatial variability of REEs in topsoils of Itataia phosphate deposit region. In addition, the influence of soil properties on the geochemistry of REEs was investigated. Results showed that relatively high mean concentrations (mg kg−1) of heavy REEs (Gd 6.01; Tb 1.25; Ho 1.15; Er 4.05; Tm 0.64; Yb 4.61; Lu 0.65) were found in surface soils samples. Soil properties showed weak influence on the geochemical behavior of REEs in soils, except for the clay content. On the other hand, parent material characteristics, such as P and U, had strong influence on REEs concentrations. Spatial distribution patterns of REEs in soils are clearly associated with P and U contents. Therefore, geochemical surveys aiming at the delineation of ore-bearing zones in the region can benefit from our data. The results of this work reinforce the perspective for co-mining of P, U and REEs in this important P–U reserve.

  • 2017 Outstanding Reviewers 2018-02-21
  • Seasonal occurrence, source evaluation and ecological risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in industrial and agricultural effluents discharged in Wadi El Bey (Tunisia) 2018-02-13

    Abstract

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are of great concern due to their persistence, bioaccumulation and toxic properties. The occurrence, source and ecological risk assessment of 26 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in industrial and agricultural effluents affecting the Wadi El Bey watershed were investigated by means of gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric analysis (GC/MS). Total PAHs (∑ 26 PAH) ranged from 1.21 to 91.7 µg/L. The 4- and 5-ring compounds were the principal PAHs detected in most of 5 sites examined. Diagnostic concentration ratios and molecular indices were performed to identify the PAH sources. Results show that PAHs could originate from petrogenic, pyrolytic and mixed sources. According to the ecotoxicological assessment, the potential risk associated with PAHs affecting agricultural and industrial effluents ranged from moderate to high for both aquatic ecosystem and human health. The toxic equivalency factor (TEF) approach indicated that benzo[a]pyrene and benz[a]anthracene were the principal responsible for carcinogenic power of samples.