SEGH Articles

Report 9th ISEG, Aveiro, Portugal

07 November 2012
SEGH members were delighted to attend and participate in the 9th International Symposium on Environmental Geochemistry organised by staff from the University of Aveiro held during 15th - 22nd of July, 2012.

 

SEGH members were delighted to attend and participate in the 9th International Symposium on Environmental Geochemistry organised by staff from the University of Aveiro held during 15th - 22nd of July, 2012.

The local organising committee and international scientific committee was chaired by Professor Eduardo Anselmo Ferreira da Silva (Geosciences Department, Aveiro University, Portugal), supported by colleagues from across the University and by the IAGC - International Association of Geochemistry, the SEGH - Society of Environmental Geochemistry and Health and the IMGA - International Medical Geology Association, which were represented in the event by Clemens Reimann (President of the IAGC), Xiang-dong Li (President of SEGH), Andrew Hursthouse (European Chair of SEGH) and José Centeno (Chairman of the IMGA). The conference was sponsored by:

 

  • ·         GeoBioTec Research Unit
  • ·         Cesam Research Centre
  • ·         Delta Cafés
  • ·         PLM
  • ·         Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian
  • ·         TAP Portugal

The conference involved four pre-conference short-courses, a scientific program (plenary lectures, oral and poster presentations) of 5 days and a post-conference field trip.

The eight plenary sessions provided a wide range of topics across environmental geochemistry interests including:

  • “Environmental health impact of legacy uranium mining in Portugal” by Fernando Carvalho,
  • “Challenges in Environmental geochemistry & health: health and its costs and future research priorities?” a joint platform presentation by Alex Stewart and Andrew Hursthouse,
  • “Geochemical reactivity and risk assessment: from scientific data to policy applications” by Paul Römkens
  • “Petroleum contamination assessment and bio-remediation processes” by Joan Albaiges,
  • “Remediation of municipal waste waters by artificial wetlands” by Joan Bayona,
  • “The role of geostatistics in environmental epidemiology” by Pierre Goovaerts.

From the 259 abstracts submitted to the conference, 128 were selected for oral presentations and 131 for poster. Over 250 participants representing 37 countries (Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Croatia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Macedonia, Russia, Serbia, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, The Netherlands, Tunisia, Turkey, United Kingdom, USA, Venezuela, Vietnam), have attended the conference.

 

The sessions were organized according to the following themes:

1-Geochemical records of environmental changes: climate changes and human activities

Convener: Jonh Farmer, Malin Kylander and François de Vleeschouwer

2-Sustainability in Mining and Related Environmental Issues

3-Geochemistry and Health & Medical Geology

4-Environmental Toxicology & Epidemiology

5-Environmental contamination and remediation

6-Water resources and aquatic environments

7-Biogeochemistry of trace elements, organic pollutants and radio-nuclides

8-Environmental Analytical Geochemistry

9-Modelling Environmental Systems: GIS platforms and Data Analysis

10-Perception and communication of environmental health risks and social inequality

11- Observatoire Hommes-Milieux (OHM) Special session

Forty participants attended to the “Nanomaterials, Environment and Health”, "Arsenic and Mercury in the Environment", "Human bioaccessibility of potentially harmful elements in the solid phase: risk assessment aspects of using bioaccessibility data" and "International Short Course on Medical Geology Health and Earth ‐ Building a Safer Environment" short-courses, and twenty participated in the field-trip to the uranium mines.

About 100 participants attended to the Conference Dinner at the Aliança Cellars where delegates were treated to a tour of a remarkable display of art and rock and mineral specimens collected by the company.

During the meeting six prizes were awarded to post-graduation students, 3 for the best oral presentations and 3 for the best posters. Short articles on the winning presentations will follow on the SEGH website.

Finally, discussions amongst the board members of the supporting Societies agreed a mechanism to jointly promote the ISEG conference series and news of the venue of the next meeting will be made available shortly.

Professor Andrew Hursthouse

European Chair for SEGH

Keep up to date

SEGH Events

Submit Content

Members can keep in touch with their colleagues through short news and events articles of interest to the SEGH community.

Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Characteristics of PM 2.5 , CO 2 and particle-number concentration in mass transit railway carriages in Hong Kong 2017-08-01

    Abstract

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) levels, carbon dioxide (CO2) levels and particle-number concentrations (PNC) were monitored in train carriages on seven routes of the mass transit railway in Hong Kong between March and May 2014, using real-time monitoring instruments. The 8-h average PM2.5 levels in carriages on the seven routes ranged from 24.1 to 49.8 µg/m3, higher than levels in Finland and similar to those in New York, and in most cases exceeding the standard set by the World Health Organisation (25 µg/m3). The CO2 concentration ranged from 714 to 1801 ppm on four of the routes, generally exceeding indoor air quality guidelines (1000 ppm over 8 h) and reaching levels as high as those in Beijing. PNC ranged from 1506 to 11,570 particles/cm3, lower than readings in Sydney and higher than readings in Taipei. Correlation analysis indicated that the number of passengers in a given carriage did not affect the PM2.5 concentration or PNC in the carriage. However, a significant positive correlation (p < 0.001, R 2 = 0.834) was observed between passenger numbers and CO2 levels, with each passenger contributing approximately 7.7–9.8 ppm of CO2. The real-time measurements of PM2.5 and PNC varied considerably, rising when carriage doors opened on arrival at a station and when passengers inside the carriage were more active. This suggests that air pollutants outside the train and passenger movements may contribute to PM2.5 levels and PNC. Assessment of the risk associated with PM2.5 exposure revealed that children are most severely affected by PM2.5 pollution, followed in order by juveniles, adults and the elderly. In addition, females were found to be more vulnerable to PM2.5 pollution than males (p < 0.001), and different subway lines were associated with different levels of risk.

  • Comparison of chemical compositions in air particulate matter during summer and winter in Beijing, China 2017-08-01

    Abstract

    The development of industry in Beijing, the capital of China, particularly in last decades, has caused severe environmental pollution including particulate matter (PM), dust–haze, and photochemical smog, which has already caused considerable harm to local ecological environment. Thus, in this study, air particle samples were continuously collected in August and December, 2014. And elements (Si, Al, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, Cd, Ba, Pb and Ti) and ions ( \({\text{NO}}_{3}^{-}\) , \({\text{SO}}_{4}^{2-}\) , F, Cl, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+ and \({\text{NH}}_{4}^{+}\) ) were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer and ion chromatography. According to seasonal changes, discuss the various pollution situations in order to find possible particulate matter sources and then propose appropriate control strategies to local government. The results indicated serious PM and metallic pollution in some sampling days, especially in December. Chemical Mass Balance model revealed central heating activities, road dust and vehicles contribute as main sources, account for 5.84–32.05 % differently to the summer and winter air pollution in 2014.

  • Annual ambient atmospheric mercury speciation measurement from Longjing, a rural site in Taiwan 2017-08-01

    Abstract

    The main purpose of this study was to monitor ambient air particulates and mercury species [RGM, Hg(p), GEM and total mercury] concentrations and dry depositions over rural area at Longjing in central Taiwan during October 2014 to September 2015. In addition, passive air sampler and knife-edge surrogate surface samplers were used to collect the ambient air mercury species concentrations and dry depositions, respectively, in this study. Moreover, direct mercury analyzer was directly used to detect the mercury Hg(p) and RGM concentrations. The result indicated that: (1) The average highest RGM, Hg(p), GEM and total mercury concentrations, and dry depositions were observed in January, prevailing dust storm occurred in winter season was the possible major reason responsible for the above findings. (2) The highest average RGM, Hg(p), GEM and total mercury concentrations, dry depositions and velocities were occurred in winter. This is because that China is the largest atmospheric mercury (Hg) emitter in the world. Its Hg emissions and environmental impacts need to be evaluated. (3) The results indicated that the total mercury ratios of Kaohsiung to that of this study were 5.61. This is because that Kaohsiung has the largest industry density (~60 %) in Taiwan. (4) the USA showed average lower mercury species concentrations when compared to those of the other world countries. The average ratios of China/USA values were 89, 76 and 160 for total mercury, RGM and Hg(p), respectively, during the years of 2000–2012.