SEGH Articles

SEGH 2014

06 February 2014
Dr Jane Entwistle is Head of Department of Geography at Northumbria University and is organising the 2014 SEGH conference. Here she gives some insight into the host organisation and city.

The Department of Geography at Northumbria University are delighted to host the 2014 SEGH conference. The conference oral and poster sessions will run over 3 days (1st – 3rd July), with a pre-conference workshop (30th June) led by Dr Mark Cave and Dr Joanna Wragg of the British Geological Survey, and a post-conference excursion (4th July) taking in some of the sights the North East of England has to offer, including a stop on Hadrian’s Wall. For specific details of the conference programme, keynote and invited speakers please go to www.northumbria.ac.uk/segh2014.

Northumbria University, in Newcastle upon Tyne, is renowned for the excellence of its teaching, as well as its research. Based in the popular, safe and vibrant city of Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumbria offers you one of the best academic and social experiences possible. Newcastle is known for its lively nightlife and friendly inhabitants, and is home to the world famous Newcastle United premier league football club and its 'Toon Army' (St James's Park stadium is situated in the city centre, only a 10 minute stroll from the campus). Newcastle also has its own Chinatown, several art galleries and museums, and Antony Gormley's Angel of the North stands on a low hill next to the main A1 southern road approach to Newcastle. The city is steeped in history having originated as a Roman settlement on the banks of the River Tyne over 2000 years ago. Newcastle is also the gateway to the spectacular Northumberland Coast with its sandy beaches and stunning coastal castles.

The University itself was formed in 1969 from the amalgamation of three regional colleges and today is the largest university in the North East of England with a student population of around 33,000 from over 125 countries. The Department of Geography sits within one of four faculties, the Faculty of Engineering and Environment. Research in the Department focuses around three research groups, with strong synergies between these groups:

Cold and Palaeo Environments. Members of the group work in polar and high mountain environments addressing key problems in Earth Systems Science. Current research includes: glacier mass balance, ice/water/sediment interaction and ice sheet dynamics; slope and coastal cliff processes and large landslide deposits; palaeo-biogeography and palaeo-biome reconstruction for modelling past climates; fluvial processes in large Arctic river systems; environmental microbiology; and subglacial lakes, as part of the Lake Ellsworth Consortium.

Communities and Resilience. Members of the group work in diverse topics from the localism of community engagement and social inclusion to the internationalism of world city economics and disaster risk reduction across Africa and Asia. The group also hosts the Disasters and Development Network (DDN), which aims to develop through research, teaching and learning, the knowledge and skills to address hazards, disasters and complex emergencies from the perspective of different development debates and experience.

Environmental Geochemistry and Ecology. Research in this area is focused upon the sustainability of the physical, chemical and biological environment. There is a strong focus on the application of these fields to problems from the local to global scale. This approach is supported by the Northumbrian Environmental Training and Research Centre (NETREC), a dedicated research, consultancy and training unit that has been running since 1996. NETREC operates the North of England Air Quality in Major Incidents Service on behalf of the UK Environment Agency. Current research includes: environmental analysis to detect and model bioavailability and bioaccessibility of metals and other pollutants in the environment and the associated risks to human health; ecological resilience and climatic impacts on biodiversity; carbon capture and ecosystem services.

Recently refurbished laboratories provide facilities for environmental geochemistry and microbiology, in addition to a dedicated laboratory (including core storage, HF fume cupboard, micro-balance and microscope rooms) for palaeo-environmental research. Available instrumentation includes Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry; High Performance Liquid Chromatography; Gas Chromatography and Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry; Scanning Electron Microscope with energy dispersive spectrometry; and a Flash 2000 organic elemental analyser. Over £0.5 million has been invested in field equipment including: terrestrial laser scanner with ~2km range; sub-bottom profiler for lakes and offshore surveys; portable XRF system; global positioning systems for precise point positioning; state-of-the-art unmanned aerial vehicles with high-resolution cameras for DEM generation and change detection; novel bespoke borehole radar equipment; ground-penetrating radar; seismic equipment; meteorological and air-monitoring equipment; and lake coring equipment.

We look forward to welcoming you to Newcastle and to Northumbria University and of course we will be happy to arrange a tour of the facilities during the conference.

Dr Jane Entwisle

Organiser of SEGH 2014

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