SEGH Articles

SEGH Journal Impact Factor News

03 August 2014
The Society's journal Environmental Geochemistry & Health (EGAH), received good news recently with the announcement of a significant increase in its impact factor, now reaching 2.573.

The editor in Chief, Professor Ming Hung Wong, sent the following message to SEGH members:

 

I am very pleased with the new impact factor which indicated the articles included in our EGAH are interesting, important and timely. The past few years, we have received an increasing number of high quality papers from more countries, addressing various current issues on environmental geochemistry of elements and their environmental and human health. There is no doubt that EGAH will scale new height in the very near future, judging from the momentum we have experienced the past few years.

May I use this opportunity to thank our publisher at Springer, Betty and Paul for their continuous guidance, Andrew (Hursthouse) and members of SEGH board’s contribution in shaping the future directions of EGAH, the coordinating editors for overseeing papers assigned to them, and the reviewers for commenting on the papers. I sincerely hope that you will continue to support EGAH by serving on the board, and serving as reviewers. Nevertheless, most important of all, send your high quality papers to EGAH.

Best wishes

Ming Hung Wong,

Editor in Chief, Environmental Geochemistry & Health

 

On behalf of the SEGH board I would also like to record our thanks to Springer staff and in particular personal best wishes to Betty Van Herk, who retired from Springer on 31st July 2014. Betty and her colleagues have supported SEGH over many years, beyond the role of publishing the journal by discussing SEGH conference themes and topics to help raise both the Society and Journal profile. A great team and part of a wider SEGH “family”. Our conferences continue to be successful and popular, organised with great enthusiasm and good scientific focus. It is wonderful to see this translating into high quality papers with increasing impact.  Don't forget, you can access EGAH and its back catalogue through www.segh.net as a full member of SEGH.

 

Professor Andrew Hursthouse

International President, SEGH

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Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Exposure to respirable and fine dust particle over North-Central India: chemical characterization, source interpretation, and health risk analysis 2019-12-10

    Abstract

    This study enhances the understanding of the particulate matters (PM2.5 and PM10) and their physical and chemical behavior over the Taj Mahal, Agra, in North-Central India. The mass concentration was determined, and the shape and size of the particles and chemical characterizations have been carried out using SEM–EDX. The high level and significant variation of PM10 (162.2 µg m−3) and PM2.5 (83.9 µg m−3) were observed. The exceedance factor of the present study region is in critical and moderate condition. Morphological characterization reveals the particles of different shapes and sizes, while elemental analysis shows the presence of Si, Al, Fe, Ca, K, Cl, Mg, Na, Cu, and Zn. The dominance of Si indicated the contribution of natural sources, i.e., soil over this region. Three significant sources, viz. soil/road paved dust/vegetative emissions, vehicular/industrial emissions, and intermingling of dust and combustion particles, have been identified using principal component analysis over North-Central India. Health risk analysis of particulate matter identified carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic metals in the present study, which comes in contact with human beings during inhalation. The non-carcinogenic risk was much higher than the acceptable level. The high carcinogenic risks were found in Zn in PM10 and Cu in PM2.5 for both children and adults.

  • Integration of remote sensing data and in situ measurements to monitor the water quality of the Ismailia Canal, Nile Delta, Egypt 2019-12-10

    Abstract

    The Ismailia Canal is one of the most important tributaries of the River Nile in Egypt. It is threatened by extinction from several sources of pollution, in addition to the intersection and nearness of the canal path with the Bilbayes drain and the effluent from the two largest conventional wastewater treatment plants in Greater Cairo. In this study, the integration of remote sensing and geospatial information system techniques is carried out to enhance the contribution of satellite data in water quality management in the Ismailia Canal. A Landsat-8 operational land imager image dated 2018 was used to detect the land use and land cover changes in the area of study, in addition to retrieving various spectral band ratios. Statistical correlations were applied among the extracted band ratios and the measured in situ water quality parameters. The most appropriate spectral band ratios were extracted from the NIR band (near infrared/blue), which showed a significant correlation with eight water quality metrics (CO3, BOD5, COD, TSS, TDS, Cl, NH4, and fecal coliform bacteria). A linear regression model was then established to predict information about these important water quality parameters along Ismailia Canal. The developed models, using linear regression equations for this study, give a set of powerful decision support frameworks with statistical tools to provide comprehensive, integrated views of surface water quality information under similar circumstances.

  • Geophagy among East African Chimpanzees: consumed soils provide protection from plant secondary compounds and bioavailable iron 2019-12-01

    Abstract

    Geophagy, the intentional consumption of earth materials, has been recorded in humans and other animals. It has been hypothesized that geophagy is an adaptive behavior, and that clay minerals commonly found in eaten soil can provide protection from toxins and/or supplement micronutrients. To test these hypotheses, we monitored chimpanzee geophagy using camera traps in four permanent sites at the Budongo Forest Reserve, Uganda, from October 2015–October 2016. We also collected plants, and soil chimpanzees were observed eating. We analyzed 10 plant and 45 soil samples to characterize geophagic behavior and geophagic soil and determine (1) whether micronutrients are available from the soil under physiological conditions and if iron is bioavailable, (2) the concentration of phenolic compounds in plants, and (3) if consumed soils are able to adsorb these phenolics. Chimpanzees ate soil and drank clay-infused water containing 1:1 and 2:1 clay minerals and > 30% sand. Under physiological conditions, the soils released calcium, iron, and magnesium. In vitro Caco-2 experiments found that five times more iron was bioavailable from three of four soil samples found at the base of trees. Plant samples contained approximately 60 μg/mg gallic acid equivalent. Soil from one site contained 10 times more 2:1 clay minerals, which were better at removing phenolics present in their diet. We suggest that geophagy may provide bioavailable iron and protection from phenolics, which have increased in plants over the last 20 years. In summary, geophagy within the Sonso community is multifunctional and may be an important self-medicative behavior.