SEGH Articles

SEGH Journal Impact Factor News

03 August 2014
The Society's journal Environmental Geochemistry & Health (EGAH), received good news recently with the announcement of a significant increase in its impact factor, now reaching 2.573.

The editor in Chief, Professor Ming Hung Wong, sent the following message to SEGH members:

 

I am very pleased with the new impact factor which indicated the articles included in our EGAH are interesting, important and timely. The past few years, we have received an increasing number of high quality papers from more countries, addressing various current issues on environmental geochemistry of elements and their environmental and human health. There is no doubt that EGAH will scale new height in the very near future, judging from the momentum we have experienced the past few years.

May I use this opportunity to thank our publisher at Springer, Betty and Paul for their continuous guidance, Andrew (Hursthouse) and members of SEGH board’s contribution in shaping the future directions of EGAH, the coordinating editors for overseeing papers assigned to them, and the reviewers for commenting on the papers. I sincerely hope that you will continue to support EGAH by serving on the board, and serving as reviewers. Nevertheless, most important of all, send your high quality papers to EGAH.

Best wishes

Ming Hung Wong,

Editor in Chief, Environmental Geochemistry & Health

 

On behalf of the SEGH board I would also like to record our thanks to Springer staff and in particular personal best wishes to Betty Van Herk, who retired from Springer on 31st July 2014. Betty and her colleagues have supported SEGH over many years, beyond the role of publishing the journal by discussing SEGH conference themes and topics to help raise both the Society and Journal profile. A great team and part of a wider SEGH “family”. Our conferences continue to be successful and popular, organised with great enthusiasm and good scientific focus. It is wonderful to see this translating into high quality papers with increasing impact.  Don't forget, you can access EGAH and its back catalogue through www.segh.net as a full member of SEGH.

 

Professor Andrew Hursthouse

International President, SEGH

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Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Editorial 2018-12-11
  • Chemical fractionation of heavy metals in fine particulate matter and their health risk assessment through inhalation exposure pathway 2018-12-11

    Abstract

    Samples of PM2.5 were collected from an urban area close to a national highway in Agra, India and sequentially extracted into four different fractions: water soluble (F1), reducible (F2), oxidizable (F3) and residual fraction (F4) for chemical fractionation of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and lead (Pb). The metals were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy in each fraction. The average mass concentration of PM2.5 was 93 ± 24 μg m−3.The total concentrations of Cr, Pb, Ni, Co, As and Cd in fine particle were 192 ± 54, 128 ± 25, 108 ± 34, 36 ± 6, 35 ± 5 and 8 ± 2 ng m−3, respectively. Results indicated that Cd and Co had the most bioavailability indexes. Risk Assessment Code and contamination factors were calculated to assess the environmental risk. The present study evaluated the potential Pb hazard to young children using the Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic Model. From the model, the probability density of PbB (blood lead level) revealed that at the prevailing atmospheric concentration, 0.302 children are expected to have PbB concentrations exceeding 10 μg dL−1 and an estimated IQ (intelligence quotient) loss of 1.8 points. The predicted blood Pb levels belong to Group 3 (PbB < 5 μg dL−1). Based on the bioavailable fractions, carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risks via inhalation exposure were assessed for infants, toddlers, children, males and females. The hazard index for potential toxic metals was 2.50, which was higher than the safe limit (1). However, the combined carcinogenic risk for infants, toddlers, children, males and females was marginally higher than the precautionary criterion (10−6).

  • Effects of steel slag and biochar amendments on CO 2 , CH 4 , and N 2 O flux, and rice productivity in a subtropical Chinese paddy field 2018-12-07

    Abstract

    Steel slag, a by-product of the steel industry, contains high amounts of active iron oxide and silica which can act as an oxidizing agent in agricultural soils. Biochar is a rich source of carbon, and the combined application of biochar and steel slag is assumed to have positive impacts on soil properties as well as plant growth, which are yet to be validated scientifically. We conducted a field experiment for two rice paddies (early and late paddy) to determine the individual and combined effects of steel slag and biochar amendments on CO2, CH4, and N2O emission, and rice productivity in a subtropical paddy field of China. The amendments did not significantly affect rice yield. It was observed that CO2 was the main greenhouse gas emitted from all treatments of both paddies. Steel slag decreased the cumulative CO2 flux in the late paddy. Biochar as well as steel slag + biochar treatment decreased the cumulative CO2 flux in the late paddy and for the complete year (early and late paddy), while steel slag + biochar treatment also decreased the cumulative CH4 flux in the early paddy. The biochar, and steel slag + biochar amendments decreased the global warming potential (GWP). Interestingly, the cumulative annual GWP was lower for the biochar (55,422 kg CO2-eq ha−1), and steel slag + biochar (53,965 kg CO2-eq ha−1) treatments than the control (68,962 kg CO2-eq ha−1). Total GWP per unit yield was lower for the combined application of steel slag + biochar (8951 kg CO2-eq Mg−1 yield) compared to the control (12,805 kg CO2-eq Mg−1 yield). This study suggested that the combined application of steel slag and biochar could be an effective long-term strategy to reduce greenhouse gases emission from paddies without any detrimental effect on the yield.