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05 February 2014
A hidden opportunity: Collaborative Development of teaching and learning in Environmental Geochemistry and Health at the Department of Geology, University of Calabar, Nigeria

 

The topic of Environmental Geochemistry has existed as a postgraduate course of study in the Department of Geology, University of Calabar in Nigeria for the past eighteen years. After my Commonwealth Academic Fellowship in 2008-2009, hosted by Prof A.S Hursthouse at the School of Science, University of the West of Scotland, I became a member of SEGH. The skills acquired during this period and as a registered member of SEGH, we decided to review the existing environmental geochemistry curriculum during my tenure as the Head of Department in 2012, since being established in 1976, its first female to hold that post.

 

Through my colleagues in SEGH, I was able to consult widely with members of the International SEGH board to review and gather opinion on the programme topics and syllabus content. This exercise was of great help and a real benefit to get feedback from the environmental geochemistry and health community, giving a real international perspective. It has helped to provide a good justification for changes to the programme in discussion with our University. The course was approved as an area of specialization under Environmental Geoscience section starting from 2013/2014 session. It is among the courses currently being advertised by the graduate school for this session and it will be in cooperated into the new graduate school brochure of the University to help to give it a wider publicity. It is anticipated that in future this will be extended to the undergraduate level when the curriculum will be reviewed as well.

We also hope that with further support from the members of SEGH we will be able to carry out some collaborative research where we lack the necessary laboratory facilities and some graduate students will be able to benefit from the expertise of SEGH members as the need arises.

At this juncture, I would like to thank members of SEGH for their input in structuring of the curriculum.

 

Dr Therese Nganje

University of Calabar

 

 

Pictures:

  1. Dr Therese Nganje with Departmental alumni, 2012
  2. Students of the Department of Geology, University of Calabar, 2012
  3. University of Calabar
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Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

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    Abstract

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    Abstract

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    Abstract

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