SEGH Articles

SEGH review of meetings

01 January 2013
Review of SEGH meetings and conferences reported in EGAH.

Earlier you responded to a request to complete our questionnaire about your experience at the annual meetings of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health, for which we thank you. You kindly gave us your name for acknowledgement in the paper.

You will be pleased to know that the paper has been published, in Environmental Geochemistry and Health this month:

Stewart AG, Worsley A, Holden V, Hursthouse AS. Evaluating the impact of interdisciplinary networking in Environmental Geochemistry and Health: Reviewing SEGH conferences and workshops. Environmental Geochemistry and Health, Special edition. 2012; 34(6): 653-664. DOI: 10.1007/s10653-012-9487-6. PMID: 23014882.

Abstract

The Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH) is a forum for multidisciplinary interaction relating the geochemical environment to health. With national funding, SEGH identified collaborative opportunities through the MULTITUDE series of workshops (2007–2011). We reviewed the meetings by electronic questionnaire (39 % response). Smaller meetings saw most returning delegates, suggesting networking and personal interaction is a key positive feature of SEGH; 31 % of practitioners and 25 % of academics participated in more than one meeting. Collaboration between SEGH participants resulted in joint funding (13 academics, 4 practitioners, 1 other) and joint papers (19, 5, 3). Evidence of behavioural change was seen in comments in five themes regarding the impacts of the conferences: support for current direction; impact on education practice (academics); new approaches; networking; multidisciplinary work. Multidisciplinary meetings and resulting networking were seen as having real value by many respondents, who encouraged further active pursuit of these activities. SEGH is eager to continue these activities which transform research, education and practice, resulting in a better understanding of the structure and processes comprising the broad geochemical environment on health. Comments showed the value and strength of small, well-organised conferences, bringing together a mixed group of disciplines, both research and applied, in a relaxed atmosphere. The absence of serious negative critique along with clear, positive comments suggests that there is a substantial level of support for, and even pleasure in, SEGH multidisciplinary conferences and workshops over the past years. It is encouraging that annual European conferences are viewed as such a positive achievement.

 

Thank you again for your participation in the survey and review of the meetings of the society.

 

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You may be interested to know that subscriptions to the society are now renewable, at £40.00 for full membership, £20.00 for student membership and £17.00 for members who do not wish to access the journal.

Part of your membership fee goes towards the upkeep of the SEGH website and the maintenance of the online payment option. This has proved to be completely secure and successful and the easiest and quickest method of paying subscriptions. We, along with SagePay, who store our financial cardholder information, are fully compliant with the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) which means that your personal data is stored to the highest possible professional safety standard.

Therefore, if possible please renew your membership via the SEGH website: www.segh.net.

Please note, online payments are handled by SagePay and will be charged in £GBP, but you will be billed in your local currency. If renewal online is not possible, we are still accepting bank transfers or cheques. Please get in touch by email for full details.

2013 Conference

Plans are also well in hand for the 29th International SEGH Conference in Toulouse, France 8th - 12th July, 2013, organised by EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement). You will notice from the website that there are excellent registration concessions for SEGH members.

2013 Conference website: http://segh2013.sciencesconf.org/

Dr Alex G Stewart
Consultant in Health Protection Cheshire & Merseyside Health Protection Unit, UK / International Board Member SEGH

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