SEGH Articles

SEGH review of meetings

01 January 2013
Review of SEGH meetings and conferences reported in EGAH.

Earlier you responded to a request to complete our questionnaire about your experience at the annual meetings of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health, for which we thank you. You kindly gave us your name for acknowledgement in the paper.

You will be pleased to know that the paper has been published, in Environmental Geochemistry and Health this month:

Stewart AG, Worsley A, Holden V, Hursthouse AS. Evaluating the impact of interdisciplinary networking in Environmental Geochemistry and Health: Reviewing SEGH conferences and workshops. Environmental Geochemistry and Health, Special edition. 2012; 34(6): 653-664. DOI: 10.1007/s10653-012-9487-6. PMID: 23014882.

Abstract

The Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH) is a forum for multidisciplinary interaction relating the geochemical environment to health. With national funding, SEGH identified collaborative opportunities through the MULTITUDE series of workshops (2007–2011). We reviewed the meetings by electronic questionnaire (39 % response). Smaller meetings saw most returning delegates, suggesting networking and personal interaction is a key positive feature of SEGH; 31 % of practitioners and 25 % of academics participated in more than one meeting. Collaboration between SEGH participants resulted in joint funding (13 academics, 4 practitioners, 1 other) and joint papers (19, 5, 3). Evidence of behavioural change was seen in comments in five themes regarding the impacts of the conferences: support for current direction; impact on education practice (academics); new approaches; networking; multidisciplinary work. Multidisciplinary meetings and resulting networking were seen as having real value by many respondents, who encouraged further active pursuit of these activities. SEGH is eager to continue these activities which transform research, education and practice, resulting in a better understanding of the structure and processes comprising the broad geochemical environment on health. Comments showed the value and strength of small, well-organised conferences, bringing together a mixed group of disciplines, both research and applied, in a relaxed atmosphere. The absence of serious negative critique along with clear, positive comments suggests that there is a substantial level of support for, and even pleasure in, SEGH multidisciplinary conferences and workshops over the past years. It is encouraging that annual European conferences are viewed as such a positive achievement.

 

Thank you again for your participation in the survey and review of the meetings of the society.

 

Subscriptions

You may be interested to know that subscriptions to the society are now renewable, at £40.00 for full membership, £20.00 for student membership and £17.00 for members who do not wish to access the journal.

Part of your membership fee goes towards the upkeep of the SEGH website and the maintenance of the online payment option. This has proved to be completely secure and successful and the easiest and quickest method of paying subscriptions. We, along with SagePay, who store our financial cardholder information, are fully compliant with the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) which means that your personal data is stored to the highest possible professional safety standard.

Therefore, if possible please renew your membership via the SEGH website: www.segh.net.

Please note, online payments are handled by SagePay and will be charged in £GBP, but you will be billed in your local currency. If renewal online is not possible, we are still accepting bank transfers or cheques. Please get in touch by email for full details.

2013 Conference

Plans are also well in hand for the 29th International SEGH Conference in Toulouse, France 8th - 12th July, 2013, organised by EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement). You will notice from the website that there are excellent registration concessions for SEGH members.

2013 Conference website: http://segh2013.sciencesconf.org/

Dr Alex G Stewart
Consultant in Health Protection Cheshire & Merseyside Health Protection Unit, UK / International Board Member SEGH

Keep up to date

Submit Content

Members can keep in touch with their colleagues through short news and events articles of interest to the SEGH community.

Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Membrane fouling control by Ca 2+ during coagulation–ultrafiltration process for algal-rich water treatment 2019-04-16

    Abstract

    Seasonal algal bloom, a water supply issue worldwide, can be efficiently solved by membrane technology. However, membranes typically suffer from serious fouling, which hinders the wide application of this technology. In this study, the feasibility of adding Ca2+ to control membrane fouling in coagulation–membrane treatment of algal-rich water was investigated. According to the results obtained, the normalized membrane flux decreased by a lower extent upon increasing the concentration of Ca2+ from 0 to 10 mmol/L. Simultaneously, the floc particle size increased significantly with the concentration of Ca2+, which leads to a lower hydraulic resistance. The coagulation performance is also enhanced with the concentration of Ca2+, inducing a slight osmotic pressure-induced resistance. The formation of Ca2+ coagulation flocs resulted in a looser, thin, and permeable cake layer on the membrane surface. This cake layer rejected organic pollutants and could be easily removed by physical and chemical cleaning treatments, as revealed by scanning electron microscopy images. The hydraulic irreversible membrane resistance was significantly reduced upon addition of Ca2+. All these findings suggest that the addition of Ca2+ may provide a simple-operation, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly technology for controlling membrane fouling during coagulation–membrane process for algal-rich water treatment.

  • Evaluation of the raw water quality: physicochemical and toxicological approaches 2019-04-13

    Abstract

    Environmental degradation has increased, mainly as a result of anthropogenic effects arising from population, industrial and agricultural growth. Water pollution is a problem that affects health, safety and welfare of the whole biota which shares the same environment. In Goiânia and metropolitan region, the main water body is the Meia Ponte River that is used for the abstraction of water, disposal of treated wastewater and effluents. In addition, this river receives wastewater from urban and rural areas. The aim in this present study was to evaluate the quality of raw water by some physical, chemical and toxicological tests. The physicochemical results found high levels of turbidity, conductivity, aluminum, phosphorus and metal iron, manganese, copper and lithium when compared to the standards of the Brazilian legislation. The values found of toxicity demonstrated a high degree of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. Therefore, it was concluded that the Meia Ponte River has been undergoing constant environmental degradation, causing the poor quality of its waters. Thus, measures for the prevention and recovery should be adopted for the maintenance of the Meia Ponte River.

  • Review of the nature of some geophagic materials and their potential health effects on pregnant women: some examples from Africa 2019-04-11

    Abstract

    The voluntary human consumption of soil known as geophagy is a global practice and deep-rooted in many African cultures. The nature of geophagic material varies widely from the types to the composition. Generally, clay and termite mound soils are the main materials consumed by geophagists. Several studies revealed that gestating women across the world consume more soil than other groups for numerous motives. These motivations are related to medicinal, cultural and nutrients supplementation. Although geophagy in pregnancy (GiP) is a universal dynamic habit, the highest prevalence has been reported in African countries such as Kenya, Ghana, Rwanda, Nigeria, Tanzania, and South Africa. Geophagy can be both beneficial and detrimental. Its health effects depend on the amount and composition of the ingested soils, which is subjective to the geology and soil formation processes. In most cases, the negative health effects concomitant with the practice of geophagy eclipse the positive effects. Therefore, knowledge about the nature of geophagic material and the health effects that might arise from their consumption is important.