SEGH Articles

SESEH Promotes Collaborations with China in Environment and Health

01 October 2012
The 2012 Sino-European Symposium on Environment and Health (SESEH 2012) was successfully held at the National University of Ireland, Galway during August 20 - 25, 2012.

This brand new conference has attracted a total number of 212 participants from a total number of 28 countries, including 53 students and 10 accompanying persons. Nearly half of the participants are Chinese, with the number of 93. Among them 77 are directly from China, and 16 are overseas Chinese. The number of participants from Ireland is 57, including 7 overseas Chinese studying or working in Ireland.

 

The SESEH 2012 provides an internationally leading platform for interaction between scientists, consultants, and public servants engaged in the multi-disciplinary areas of environment and health. With the fast economic growth, the importance of environment and health is widely recognized in China, and China welcomes international experts for collaboration. The aim of SESEH is to promote collaborations with China. This symposium provides an opportunity for a direct communication between experts from China and the rest of the world, and helps to foster and develop Microbiology, Pharmaceuticals, POPs and Pesticides, Sediment Pollution, Soil Remediation, Soil Threats, Smart Wastewater Treatment, and Water Quality.  There were international collaborations with China, the 2nd largest economy of the world.

The theme of environment and health is one of the most challenging issues that human beings are currently facing. With the economic development and improvement of our quality of life, the environment around us is under pressure, and often deteriorating. This has raised many questions that require answers: Is the air we breathe still fresh? Is the water we drink still clean? Is the food we eat still safe? This conference brings together international experts in Galway to discuss these questions. The themes cover a wide range of topics including: Advanced Medical Mineralogy, Air Quality, Bioavailability and bioaccessibility, Clays, Coal and Health, Cryptosporidium, Environmental Health, Environmental Health in Buildings, Environmental Management, Environmental Sensors, GIS and Quantitative Methods, Land Use and Soil Environment.

 

A total of 6 internationally leading experts serving as keynote speakers of SESEH 2012: Professors Ming-Hung Wong, Shu Tao, Xiaoying Zheng, Derek Clements-Croome, Jerome Nriagu, and William Manning. In addition, the world-renowned Medical Geology Short Course was successfully held as a pre-conference workshop of SESEH 2012, led by Dr. Jose Centeno, Dr. Olle Selinus, Dr. Bob Finkelman, and Dr. Maurice Mulcahy.

 

 

 

A special section in Environmental Pollution and a special issue in Environmental Geochemistry and Health are under preparation. One best student poster and two best student oral presentations were awarded.

 

Galway is a popular tourist destination, attracting more than 1 million international visitors annually. SESEH 2012 delegates and their accompanying persons have undoubtedly made a significant contribution to the local economy. Galway has provided SESEH 2012 delegates a good experience with its well preserved Irish tradition, hospitality and natural beauty.

 

The SESEH 2012 conference is co-organised by the GIS Centre, Ryan Institute of NUI Galway (http://www.ryaninstitute.ie/facilities/gis-centre), The Geographical Society of China (www.gsc.org.cn) and Environmental Sciences Association of Ireland (ISAI, www.esaiweb.org), supported by Ryan Institute of NUI Galway (www.ryaninstitute.ie), Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH, www.segh.net), International Medical Geology Association (IMGA, www.medicalgeology.org), Geographical Society of Ireland (www.ucd.ie/gsi), Ireland Chinese Association of Environment, Resources & Energy (ICAERE, www.icaere.ie), National Centre for Geocomputation (ncg.nuim.ie), South China Institute of Environmental Sciences (http://www.scies.org/en) and Chinese Environmental Scholars & Professionals Network (http://www.cespn.net/english).

Dr Chaosheng Zhang, University of Ireland, Galway.

 

 

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