SEGH Articles

The CHASE Project: Chemical composition of airborne particles and snow in East Antarctica (Dronning Maud Land)

15 January 2018
Professor Nadine Mattielli, of Universite Libre de Bruxelles, provides us with an exciting introduction to the CHASE project, including some breathtaking photographs from a recent fieldwork expedition to Antarctica.

CHASE Project: Chemical composition of airborne particles and snow in East Antarctica (Dronning Maud Land)

Atmospheric  composition  change  is  a  main  driver  of  present  and  near-future  climate  change  with  airborne  particles  playing  a major  role  therein.  But  the  aerosol  fluxes  and  sources  in  Antarctica  and  its  closely  associated  Southern  Ocean  are  poorly constrained, in particular the particle chemistry. Antarctica is considered the best-preserved region on Earth from anthropogenic emissions.  However,  the  impact  of  anthropogenic  airborne  particles  and  pollutants  could  be  significantly  larger  than  expected. Furthermore,  a  detailed  understanding  of  present-day  atmospheric  transport  pathways  of  particles  and  of  volatile  organic compounds (VOC) from source to deposition in Antarctica remains essential to document biogeochemical cycles and the relative importance of natural and anthropogenic compounds, which are not well constrained at the moment. Those information  are  relevant,  not  only  to  interpret  climatic  data  extracted  from  ice  cores  and  the  transport  and  deposition  of  mineral  nutrients,  but  are also essential  to better  identify  organic  micro-pollutants  in  polar  regions  and  their  potential  interactions  with  human  activities  and  health

The  research  project  CHASE  (Unravelling Particle Chemistry in Dronning Maud Land (Antarctica): from atmosphere to surface snow)  funded  by  BELSPO  (Belgian Science Policy)  will  provide  detailed  physical-chemical  analyses  of  both atmospheric  and  surface  snow  particles  as  well  as  of  VOCs  and  thoroughly  investigates  their  atmospheric  transport  pathways.

The mission in Antarctica, as part of the CHASE project, took place from 14/11 to 23/12 in 2017. The objectives of the project were achieved, even exceeded, since the group (N. Mattielli – Université Libre de Bruxelles, Labo. G-Time; A. Mangold - Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium; and Ch. Walgraeve from Ghent University) installed five sampling sites themselves from the plateau to the coast via the PEA (Princess Elizabeth Antarctica) station along a ±200km transect. Each site is equipped with at least three passive samplers (for the analysis of suspended dust organic components and trace elements, metallic or not). At each site, snow bottles were also collected (for the analysis of trace elements and isotopic compositions of deposited atmospheric particles). Moreover, with the precious contribution of the IPF (International Polar Foundation), 100m in from the station, a container has been equipped with three active pumps to collect a larger volume of dust on filters.

 

To the top of Utsteinen near the Princess Elisabeth Antarctica Station (NE of Antarctica - Nadine Mattielli).

To the top of Utsteinen near the Princess Elisabeth Antarctica Station
(NE of Antarctica - copyright Nadine Mattielli)

The entrance of the plateau near the Princess Elisabeth Antarctica Station (NE of Antarctica - Nadine Mattielli)

The entrance of the plateau near the Princess Elisabeth Antarctica Station
(NE of Antarctica - copyright Nadine Mattielli)


Campground at the coast for the CHASE research program and the glaciologist drilling program (ULB) (NE of Antarctica - Nadine Mattielli)

 Campground at the coast for the CHASE research program and the glaciologist drilling program (ULB) (NE of Antarctica - copyright Nadine Mattielli)
 

More Pictures and explanations can be found on: http://www.bncar.be/

Nadine Mattielli

 

Keep up to date

Submit Content

Members can keep in touch with their colleagues through short news and events articles of interest to the SEGH community.

Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Review: mine tailings in an African tropical environment—mechanisms for the bioavailability of heavy metals in soils 2019-05-27

    Abstract

    Heavy metals are of environmental significance due to their effect on human health and the ecosystem. One of the major exposure pathways of Heavy metals for humans is through food crops. It is postulated in the literature that when crops are grown in soils which have excessive concentrations of heavy metals, they may absorb elevated levels of these elements thereby endangering consumers. However, due to land scarcity, especially in urban areas of Africa, potentially contaminated land around industrial dumps such as tailings is cultivated with food crops. The lack of regulation for land-usage on or near to mine tailings has not helped this situation. Moreover, most countries in tropical Africa have not defined guideline values for heavy metals in soils for various land uses, and even where such limits exist, they are based on total soil concentrations. However, the risk of uptake of heavy metals by crops or any soil organisms is determined by the bioavailable portion and not the total soil concentration. Therefore, defining bioavailable levels of heavy metals becomes very important in HM risk assessment, but methods used must be specific for particular soil types depending on the dominant sorption phases. Geochemical speciation modelling has proved to be a valuable tool in risk assessment of heavy metal-contaminated soils. Among the notable ones is WHAM (Windermere Humic Aqueous Model). But just like most other geochemical models, it was developed and adapted on temperate soils, and because major controlling variables in soils such as SOM, temperature, redox potential and mineralogy differ between temperate and tropical soils, its predictions on tropical soils may be poor. Validation and adaptation of such models for tropical soils are thus imperative before such they can be used. The latest versions (VI and VII) of WHAM are among the few that consider binding to all major binding phases. WHAM VI and VII are assemblages of three sub-models which describe binding to organic matter, (hydr)oxides of Fe, Al and Mn and clays. They predict free ion concentration, total dissolved ion concentration and organic and inorganic metal ion complexes, in soils, which are all important components for bioavailability and leaching to groundwater ways. Both WHAM VI and VII have been applied in a good number of soils studies with reported promising results. However, all these studies have been on temperate soils and have not been tried on any typical tropical soils. Nonetheless, since WHAM VII considers binding to all major binding phases, including those which are dominant in tropical soils, it would be a valuable tool in risk assessment of heavy metals in tropical soils. A discussion of the contamination of soils with heavy metals, their subsequent bioavailability to crops that are grown in these soils and the methods used to determine various bioavailable phases of heavy metals are presented in this review, with an emphasis on prospective modelling techniques for tropical soils.

  • Pesticides in the typical agricultural groundwater in Songnen plain, northeast China: occurrence, spatial distribution and health risks 2019-05-25

    Abstract

    Songnen plain is an important commodity grain base of China, and this is the first study on the comprehensive detection of multiple pesticides in groundwater. Based on an analytical method of 56 pesticides, 30 groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. At least 4 pesticides were detected in each sample and 32 out of 56 pesticides were detected. The average detected levels of individual pesticides were approximately 10–100 ng/L. Organophosphorus pesticides and carbamate pesticides were the dominant pesticides, and their percentage of total pesticide concentrations were 35.9% and 55.5%, respectively. Based on the spatial distribution, the characteristic of nonpoint source pollution was indicated in the whole study area except for a point source pollution with the influence of a sewage oxidation pond. Nine core pesticides and three distinct clusters of the core pesticides with various concentration patterns were revealed by cluster analysis. Linear regression identified a significant relationship between the cumulative detections and the cumulative concentrations, providing access to identify the outlying contaminant events that deviate substantially from the linear trend. A new insight for prediction of pesticide occurrence was provided by the Pearson correlation between some individual pesticide concentrations and the cumulative detections or the cumulative concentrations. According to health risk assessment, the residual pesticides posed medium risks for children and infants and approximately 90% of risks were composed of β-HCH, dimethoate, ethyl-p-nitrophenyl phenylphosphonothioate and methyl parathion. These findings contributed to establishing a database for future monitoring and control of pesticides in agricultural areas.

  • Correction to: Potential CO 2 intrusion in near-surface environments: a review of current research approaches to geochemical processes 2019-05-22

    In the original publication of the article, the third author name has been misspelt. The correct name is given in this correction. The original version of this article was revised.