SEGH Articles

The 15th International Congress of the Geological Society of Greece

18 June 2019
Ariadne Argyrak recalls the events of the 15th International Congress of the Geological Society of Greece, which included a special session entitled jointly organized by the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health, the IUGS Commission on Global Geochemical Baselines (CGGB) and the EuroGeoSurveys Geochemistry Expert Group

The 15th International Congress of the Geological Society of Greece -GSG 2019 was successfully held on May 22-24 2019 in Athens, Greece. The conference was hosted by the Harokopio University in an excellent venue. The International Congresses of the Geological Society of Greece are multidisciplinary earth science events, focusing on, but not limited to, the broader Aegean region and its surroundings, with the view to highlighting the contribution of geosciences to the study of natural resources, natural hazards and environment. The central theme of this year's congress was "Exploring and Protecting our Living Planet Earth". With a rich program spread in 12 general sessions and 16 special sessions, the congress attracted 723 delegates, 208 oral presentations, 184 poster presentations and 14 Keynote lectures. Conference abstracts have been authored by 1647 authors or co-authors from 36 countries.

  

SEGH presence at The 15th International Congress of the Geological Society of Greece

A special session entitled "Geochemical mapping for environmental and resource management" was jointly organized by the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health, the IUGS Commission on Global Geochemical Baselines (CGGB) and the EuroGeoSurveys Geochemistry Expert Group. The focus of the session was on geochemical mapping at all spatial scales for the study of the environment and the natural resources. The main objective was to provide the opportunity for young researchers to present their work and benefit from the interaction with well-established geochemistry experts. Furthermore, the session enabled mingle and osmosis between experts working on different aspects of geochemistry and provided the floor for exchanging experiences with working and interpreting big data like the GEMAS project or more locally focused surveys of rapidly changing environments such as urban areas and beyond. A total of 10 oral and 12 poster presentations have been included in the special session, most of them by young researchers. Two excellent keynotes were delivered during the session, one by Dr Philippe Negrel on GEMAS: GEOCHEMISTRY OF EUROPEAN SOIL FOR PRODUCING GOOD QUALITY FOOD and a second by Prof. Andrew Hursthouse on SOIL CONTAMINANT BASELINES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF URBAN ECOSYSTEMS. A lovely dinner with a view of the Parthenon over Greek delicacies was the social highlight of the event. 

Overall this event has been a perfect opportunity for promoting the scope of SEGH to a wide audience of young earth scientists. Hopefully, there will be opportunities for many more to follow. The conference program and the list of presentations of the special session T4S1 is accessible at https://www.gsg2019.gr/

Ariadne Argyraki, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece

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Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

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    Graphic abstract

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