SEGH Articles

In Memoriam: Willard R Chappell PhD

24 November 2017
With great sadness we have learned of the death of Willard (Bill) Chappell on October 7, 2017.

In Memoriam

Willard R Chappell PhD

With great sadness we have learned of the death of Willard (Bill) Chappell  on October 7, 2017.

Bill was Professor (subsequently Professor Emeritus) of Physics and Preventive Medicine at the University of Colorado Denver (USA). Bill joined our society in 1988 and was elected Secretary/Treasurer for 1989 through 1991. He served on the Board from 1992 to 2004 in a special position as Task Force Chairman of the SEGH Arsenic Task Force.  The work of the Task Force led to the Arsenic Exposure and Health Problems conferences  in 1993, 1995, 1998, 2000 and 2002. In addition to the  conference proceedings three books (Arsenic Exposure and Health Effects, edited by Willard Chappell, Charles Abernathy and Rebecca Calderon) were published. These publications were very well received by the international research community and influenced the setting of drinking water standards for arsenic. In 2005 Bill Chappell's efforts were recognized by the (SEGH) Julian J. Chisolm, Jr. Award for Outstanding Leadership in Environmental  Geochemistry and Health.

In his academic life Bill, in addition to his activities as an educator and researcher,  was Chairman of the State of Colorado Governors Scientific Advisory Committee in 1974-1975 and Chairman of the United State Department of Energy Oil Shale Task Force from 1978-1982.  In the academic year 1983/1984 he had a sabbatical leave in England as Academic Visitor in London University's Imperial College.

Bill's father and mother Will and Mildred preceded him in death.  Bill is survived by two brothers, Robert Bruce Chappell and John Heizer.  Bill's wife Juanita Benetin, whom he married on March 5, 1981 their two children Ginger Ferguson and her Husband, Robert Snook, and Robert Lincoln Ferguson, Jr.

Those of us who were privileged to know him  remember him not only for his active leadership in our society but also for him as a person, as good company, as fun. He was best described as a bon viveur, amply living up to the dictionary definition as a person who likes going to parties and who enjoys good food and wine. He was reputed to know the best restaurants in cities throughout the world.

Brian E Davies and Bobby G Wixson (Past Presidents)

 

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Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

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    Abstract

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    Graphical Abstract

  • Magnetic, geochemical characterization and health risk assessment of road dust in Xuanwei and Fuyuan, China 2018-01-19

    Abstract

    As an accumulation of solid organic and inorganic pollutant particles on outdoor ground surfaces, road dust is an important carrier of heavy metal contaminants and can be a valuable medium for characterizing urban environmental quality. Because the dusts can be an important source of atmospheric particles and take impact on human health, the aim of this study described in detail the mineralogical characteristics, morphology, and heavy metal content of road dust from Xuanwei and Fuyuan, locations with high lung cancer incidence. Our results show that the average concentrations of heavy metals in road dust were higher than their background values. Higher concentrations of heavy metals were found in the magnetic fractions (MFs) than in the non-magnetic fractions (NMFs). Magnetic measurements revealed high magnetic susceptibility values in the road dust samples, and the dominant magnetic carrier was magnetite. The magnetic grains were predominantly pseudo-single domain, multi-domain, and coarse-grained stable single domains (coarse SSD) in size. SEM/XRD analysis identified two groups of magnetic particles: spherules and angular/aggregate particles. Hazard index (HI) values for adults exposure to road dust samples, including MF, Bulk, and NMF, in both areas were lower or close to safe levels, while HI values for childhood exposure to magnetic fractions in both areas were very close or higher than safe levels. Cancer risks from road dust exposure in both areas were in the acceptable value range.

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    Abstract

    Recycling food waste for beneficial use is becoming increasingly important in resource-limited economy. In this study, waste chicken bones of different parts from restaurant industry were pyrolyzed at 600 °C and evaluated for char physicochemical properties and Pb sorption characteristics. Lead adsorption isotherms by different chicken bone chars were carried out with initial Pb concentration range of 1–1000 mg L−1 at pH 5. The Pb adsorption data were better described by the Langmuir model (R2 = 0.9289–0.9937; ARE = 22.7–29.3%) than the Freundlich model (R2 = 0.8684–0.9544; ARE = 35.4–72.0%). Among the chars derived from different chicken bone parts, the tibia bone char exhibited the highest maximum Pb adsorption capacity of 263 mg g−1 followed by the pelvis (222 mg g−1), ribs (208 mg g−1), clavicle (179 mg g−1), vertebrae (159 mg g−1), and humerus (135 mg g−1). The Pb adsorption capacities were significantly and positively correlated with the surface area, phosphate release amount, and total phosphorus content of chicken bone chars (r ≥ 0.9711). On the other hand, approximately 75–88% of the adsorbed Pb on the chicken bone chars was desorbable with 0.1 M HCl, indicating their recyclability for reuse. Results demonstrated that chicken bone char could be used as an effective adsorbent for Pb removal in wastewater.