SEGH Articles

ISEH 2016, ISEG 2016 & Geoinformatics 2016

26 January 2017
Joint International Conference on Environment, Health, GIS and Agriculture Galway, Ireland, August 14 20, 2016

The conference was chaired by Chaosheng Zhang (NUI Galway) and opened by James Browne (President of NUI Galway), followed by speeches of Xiaoyong Yue (Chinese Ambassador), Shu Tao (Honorary chair of ISEH conference series, Peking University), Hui Lin (Founder of CPGIS, The Chinese University of Hong Kong), and Cathal O’Donoghue (Head, Teagasc Rural Economy and Development Programme and Nominated Dean of Arts, Social Science and Celtic Studies at NUI Galway).

The first joint international conference of ISEH 2016 (3rd International Symposium on Environment and Health), ISEG 2016 (10th International Symposium on Environmental Geochemistry) and Geoinformatics 2016 (24th International Conference on Geoinformatics) on Environment, Health, GIS and Agriculture was successfully held at National University of Ireland (NUI), Galway, Ireland during August 14 – 20, 2016.

This conference provided a historical opportunity for international experts working in several closely related areas of environment, health, geographical information system (GIS) and agriculture, to meet and share the latest understanding of the ever growing challenges between human and our changing environment. As a joint conference, delegates were encouraged to attend any sessions of the conference and to extend their academic networks.

The conference quality was recognised as at the internationally top level, and the conference administration was recognised as professional. The reputation of the conference has been well established.

General statistics

The joint conference attracted a total number of 308 participants (62 for Geoinformatics) from 34 countries/regions. There were 206 oral presentations (51 for Geoinformatics) and 78 posters, in 44 parallel sessions. Out of which, there were 29 keynote speeches presented.

Session topics

Besides the plenary and keynote sessions, the parallel session topics included: Agriculture, Biogeochemistry, Coastal & Marine Ecosystem, Contaminated land with IBN, Drinking water, Environmental geochemistry, Environmental governance, Environmental health, Environmental management, Environmental Technology, Geochemical database, Geochemical mapping with EuroGeoSurveys, GIS and quantitative methods, Health risk, Health risk of metals, Indoor exposure, Indoor particles, Medical Geology, Mercury and other pollutants, Microbiology, Organic Chemicals, POPs, Session honouring Jiamo Fu, Soil pollution, Urbanization impacts, Water Quality, and GIS sessions.

Social activities

In the evening of Aug. 14, the welcome reception was held in Aula Maxima, inside the historical building of the Quadrangle, NUI Galway, with traditional Irish music performance, followed by a professional performance of Tsinghua University Symphony Orchestra in the Black Box Theatre in Galway.

Tsinghua University Symphony Orchestra

The conference dinner was arranged in Radisson Blu Hotel in the evening of Aug. 16, with a contemporary Irish show featuring an electrifying mix of music, song and dance. Delegates were encouraged to participate in the Irish dancing.

Field trips

Three fieldtrips were organised for conference delegates to experience the natural beautify and culture of the West of Ireland: The Burren and Cliffs of Moher (Aug. 18), Connemara (Aug. 19) and Aran Islands (Aug. 20).

International Board

The ISEG International Board was established in the evening of Aug. 15, on a trip to Lough Corrib in the ship “Corrib Princess”. The board comprises of internationally leading experts in the field of environmental geochemistry, who are tasked to help to promote ISEG conference series.

The ISEG International Board is supported by 4 international societies:

  •  AAG: The Association of Applied Geochemists
  • IAGC: The International Association of GeoChemistry

  • IMGA: International Medical Geology Association

  • SEGH: Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health

Report by Professor Chaosheng Zhang


For further information:

Special issues in journals

During the conference, discussions were made with the Editors-in-Chief of Applied Geochemistry, Environmental Geochemistry and Health, and Environmental Pollution, and guest-editor of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The arrangements were made as follows and relevant messages were sent to delegates in the end of August.

 Applied Geochemistry (Invitation ONLY)

Guest-editors: Dr. Clemens Reimann (Leading Guest-Editor)

Geochemistry, Chairman, EuroGeoSurveys Geochemistry Expert Group

Leiv Eirikssons vei 39, 7040 Trondheim

Clemens.Reimann@ngu.no

www.ngu.no

 

Co-Guest-editors: Ron Fuge, Mark Cave, Chaosheng Zhang

 

Queries regarding this Special Issue should be directed to the Leading Guest-Editor! DO NOT send your queries to conference chair!

 

Environmental Geochemistry and Health (Invitation ONLY)

Guest Editors:

Prof. Jörg Rinklebe (Leading Guest-Editor)

Full Professor for Soil- and Groundwater-Management

Kommission Head of Water- and Waste-Management / Sanitary Environmental Engineering

Institute for Soil Engineering, Water- and Waste-Management

Faculty of Architecture and Civil Engineering

University of Wuppertal, Pauluskirchstraße 7, 42285 Wuppertal, Germany

E-Mail: rinklebe@uni-wuppertal.de

http://www.boden.uni-wuppertal.de/en/home.html

 

Co-Guest Editors: Yong Sik Ok, Mark Cave, Chaosheng Zhang

Queries regarding this Special Issue should be directed to the Leading Guest-Editor! DO NOT send your queries to conference chair!

Environmental Pollution (No special issue from this conference)

It was decided that there will be no special issue in Environmental Pollution from this conference.

Delegates are welcome to submit their full papers to Environmental Pollution in the ordinary way.

 

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (Online submission is available)

A Special Issue for International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is going forward. Please notice that this is an Open Access journal, and publication fee will be required.

The detailed instructions are available here: http://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph/special_issues/ISEH

Guest Editor:

Dr. Jose A. Centeno, PhD, FRSC (Leading Guest Editor)

 

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