SEGH Articles

ISEH 2016, ISEG 2016 & Geoinformatics 2016

26 January 2017
Joint International Conference on Environment, Health, GIS and Agriculture Galway, Ireland, August 14 20, 2016

The conference was chaired by Chaosheng Zhang (NUI Galway) and opened by James Browne (President of NUI Galway), followed by speeches of Xiaoyong Yue (Chinese Ambassador), Shu Tao (Honorary chair of ISEH conference series, Peking University), Hui Lin (Founder of CPGIS, The Chinese University of Hong Kong), and Cathal O’Donoghue (Head, Teagasc Rural Economy and Development Programme and Nominated Dean of Arts, Social Science and Celtic Studies at NUI Galway).

The first joint international conference of ISEH 2016 (3rd International Symposium on Environment and Health), ISEG 2016 (10th International Symposium on Environmental Geochemistry) and Geoinformatics 2016 (24th International Conference on Geoinformatics) on Environment, Health, GIS and Agriculture was successfully held at National University of Ireland (NUI), Galway, Ireland during August 14 – 20, 2016.

This conference provided a historical opportunity for international experts working in several closely related areas of environment, health, geographical information system (GIS) and agriculture, to meet and share the latest understanding of the ever growing challenges between human and our changing environment. As a joint conference, delegates were encouraged to attend any sessions of the conference and to extend their academic networks.

The conference quality was recognised as at the internationally top level, and the conference administration was recognised as professional. The reputation of the conference has been well established.

General statistics

The joint conference attracted a total number of 308 participants (62 for Geoinformatics) from 34 countries/regions. There were 206 oral presentations (51 for Geoinformatics) and 78 posters, in 44 parallel sessions. Out of which, there were 29 keynote speeches presented.

Session topics

Besides the plenary and keynote sessions, the parallel session topics included: Agriculture, Biogeochemistry, Coastal & Marine Ecosystem, Contaminated land with IBN, Drinking water, Environmental geochemistry, Environmental governance, Environmental health, Environmental management, Environmental Technology, Geochemical database, Geochemical mapping with EuroGeoSurveys, GIS and quantitative methods, Health risk, Health risk of metals, Indoor exposure, Indoor particles, Medical Geology, Mercury and other pollutants, Microbiology, Organic Chemicals, POPs, Session honouring Jiamo Fu, Soil pollution, Urbanization impacts, Water Quality, and GIS sessions.

Social activities

In the evening of Aug. 14, the welcome reception was held in Aula Maxima, inside the historical building of the Quadrangle, NUI Galway, with traditional Irish music performance, followed by a professional performance of Tsinghua University Symphony Orchestra in the Black Box Theatre in Galway.

Tsinghua University Symphony Orchestra

The conference dinner was arranged in Radisson Blu Hotel in the evening of Aug. 16, with a contemporary Irish show featuring an electrifying mix of music, song and dance. Delegates were encouraged to participate in the Irish dancing.

Field trips

Three fieldtrips were organised for conference delegates to experience the natural beautify and culture of the West of Ireland: The Burren and Cliffs of Moher (Aug. 18), Connemara (Aug. 19) and Aran Islands (Aug. 20).

International Board

The ISEG International Board was established in the evening of Aug. 15, on a trip to Lough Corrib in the ship “Corrib Princess”. The board comprises of internationally leading experts in the field of environmental geochemistry, who are tasked to help to promote ISEG conference series.

The ISEG International Board is supported by 4 international societies:

  •  AAG: The Association of Applied Geochemists
  • IAGC: The International Association of GeoChemistry

  • IMGA: International Medical Geology Association

  • SEGH: Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health

Report by Professor Chaosheng Zhang


For further information:

Special issues in journals

During the conference, discussions were made with the Editors-in-Chief of Applied Geochemistry, Environmental Geochemistry and Health, and Environmental Pollution, and guest-editor of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The arrangements were made as follows and relevant messages were sent to delegates in the end of August.

 Applied Geochemistry (Invitation ONLY)

Guest-editors: Dr. Clemens Reimann (Leading Guest-Editor)

Geochemistry, Chairman, EuroGeoSurveys Geochemistry Expert Group

Leiv Eirikssons vei 39, 7040 Trondheim

Clemens.Reimann@ngu.no

www.ngu.no

 

Co-Guest-editors: Ron Fuge, Mark Cave, Chaosheng Zhang

 

Queries regarding this Special Issue should be directed to the Leading Guest-Editor! DO NOT send your queries to conference chair!

 

Environmental Geochemistry and Health (Invitation ONLY)

Guest Editors:

Prof. Jörg Rinklebe (Leading Guest-Editor)

Full Professor for Soil- and Groundwater-Management

Kommission Head of Water- and Waste-Management / Sanitary Environmental Engineering

Institute for Soil Engineering, Water- and Waste-Management

Faculty of Architecture and Civil Engineering

University of Wuppertal, Pauluskirchstraße 7, 42285 Wuppertal, Germany

E-Mail: rinklebe@uni-wuppertal.de

http://www.boden.uni-wuppertal.de/en/home.html

 

Co-Guest Editors: Yong Sik Ok, Mark Cave, Chaosheng Zhang

Queries regarding this Special Issue should be directed to the Leading Guest-Editor! DO NOT send your queries to conference chair!

Environmental Pollution (No special issue from this conference)

It was decided that there will be no special issue in Environmental Pollution from this conference.

Delegates are welcome to submit their full papers to Environmental Pollution in the ordinary way.

 

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (Online submission is available)

A Special Issue for International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is going forward. Please notice that this is an Open Access journal, and publication fee will be required.

The detailed instructions are available here: http://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph/special_issues/ISEH

Guest Editor:

Dr. Jose A. Centeno, PhD, FRSC (Leading Guest Editor)

 

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Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Date palm waste biochars alter a soil respiration, microbial biomass carbon, and heavy metal mobility in contaminated mined soil 2017-04-19

    Abstract

    A 30-day incubation experiment was conducted using a heavy metal-contaminated mined soil amended with date palm feedstock (FS) and its derivative biochars (BCs) at three pyrolysis temperatures of 300 (BC-300), 500 (BC-500), and 700 °C (BC-700) with different application rates (0.0, 5, 15, and 30 g kg−1) to investigate their short-term effects on soil respiration (CO2–C efflux), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), soil organic carbon (SOC), mobile fraction of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn, Mn, and Fe), pH, and electrical conductivity (EC). The results showed that FS and BC-300 with increasing addition rate significantly reduced soil pH, whereas SOC, CO2–C efflux, and soil MBC were increased compared to the control. On the contrary, BC-500 and BC-700 increased soil pH at early stage of incubation and have small or no effects on SOC, CO2–C efflux, and MBC. Based on the results, the date palm biochars exhibited much lower cumulative CO2–C efflux than feedstock, even with low-temperature biochar, indicating that BCs have C sequestration potential. Applying BC-700 at 15 and 30 g kg−1 significantly reduced cumulative CO2–C efflux by 21.8 and 45.4% compared to the control, respectively. The incorporation of FS into contaminated soil significantly increased the mobile content of Cd and Mn, but decreased the mobile content of Cu. However, BC-300 significantly reduced the mobile content of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn. It could be concluded that low-temperature biochar could be used as a soil amendment for reducing heavy metal mobility in mining contaminated soil in addition to minimize soil CO2–C efflux.

  • Historical record of anthropogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a lake sediment from the southern Tibetan Plateau 2017-04-17

    Abstract

    High-altitude lake sediments can be used as natural archives to reconstruct the history of pollutants. In this work, the temporal distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was determined in a sediment core collected from the southern Tibetan Plateau (TP), which was dated by using the 210Pb dating method and validated with the 137Cs fallout peak. The concentrations of the anthropogenic PAHs (Σ8PAH) in the sediment core ranged from 0.83 to 12 ng/g dw, and the fluxes of the Σ8PAH were in the range of 2.1–27 g/cm2/year. The temporal variations in the concentration and input flux of anthropogenic PAHs were low with little variability before the 1950s, and then gradually increased from the 1950s to the 1980s, and an accelerated increase was observed after the early 1980s. The content of total organic carbon played an insignificant role in affecting the time trends of PAHs in the sediment core. Diagnostic concentration fractions of PAH components indicate PAHs in the lake sediment of the southern TP which are mainly from biomass burning and/or from long-range atmospheric transport.

  • Determination of the potential implementation impact of 2016 ministry of environmental protection generic assessment criteria for potentially contaminated sites in China 2017-04-12

    Abstract

    The Ministry of Environmental Protection of China issued a 3rd draft edition of risk-based Generic Assessment Criteria (the MEP-GAC) in March 2016. Since these will be the first authoritative GAC in China, their implementation is likely to have a significant impact on China’s growing contaminated land management sector. This study aims to determine the potential implementation impact of the MEP-GAC through an in-depth analysis of the management context, land use scenarios, health criteria values adopted and exposure pathways considered. The MEP-GAC have been proposed for two broad categories of land use scenarios for contaminated land risk assessment, and these two categories of land use scenarios need to be further delved, and a MEP-GAC for Chinese cultivated land scenario ought to be developed, to ensure human health protection of Chinese farmers. The MEP-GAC have adopted 10−6 as the acceptable lifetime cancer risk, given the widespread extent and severe level of land contamination in China, consideration should be given to the decision on excess lifetime cancer risk of 10−5. During risk assessment process in practice, it is better to review the 20% TDI against local circumstances to determine their suitability before adopting it. The MEP-GAC are based on a SOM value of 1%, for regions with particularly high SOM, it might be necessary to develop regional GAC, due to SOM’s significant impact on the GAC developed. An authoritative risk assessment model developed based on HJ25.3-2014 would help facilitate the DQRA process in practice. The MEP-GAC could better reflect the likely exposures of China’s citizens due to vapour inhalation by using characteristics of Chinese exposure scenarios, including China-generic building stock, as inputs into the Johnson and Ettinger model as opposed to adoption of the US EPA parameters. The MEP-GAC once implemented will set the trajectory for the development of the investigation, assessment and remediation of land contamination for years.