SEGH Articles

SEGH2019 Sponsored Attendees: Adewole Michael Gbadebo

02 September 2019
Adewole Michael Gbadebo a Professor of Environmental Geochemistry at the Department of Environmental Management and Toxicology, Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Nigeria shares his experience of SEGH2019

I arrived at Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU), venue of the 35th SEGH conference at around 4 pm on Monday 1st July 2019  where  I was welcomed by Prof. Sanja Potgieter-Vermaak. On the morning of  Tuesday 2nd July 2019, I came to the venue of the conference from my hotel registered for the conference, mounted my poster on the assigned billboard, attended the welcome and introduction section and attended the day’s sessions (comprising of morning and afternoon sessions). Each session started with keynote speakers’ presentation followed by 15 minutes of Platform /Oral presentations and 2-minute flash presentations with an interlude of lunch break before the afternoon section. I was at my poster stand during the break periods to present my work to poster viewing conference-participating-audience. This I did routinely from Tuesday 2nd – Thursday 4th July 2019.

I also attended behind the scenes evening social at the Manchester City Football Stadium on the evening of Tuesday 2nd. I remember hearing Prof Sanja Potgieter-Vermaak mention that participants at the conference were from 15 countries of the world including Nigeria. At the end of the conference, during the closing ceremony/remarks, hosts of the 36th and 37th SEGH in Kenya and China were announced and acceptance speeches were given by Prof Odipo Osano from Kenya and China representatives. Prizes were given to the best poster presenter and people who worked with Prof Sanja Potgieter-Vermaak to make the conference a huge success. This was capped with SEGH AGM which took place on Thursday at the same venue of the conference with the delegates (conference participants) in attendance and Dr Michael Watts from BGS was re-elected as the chair of SEGH.

With regards to networking opportunities, the conference afforded me opportunities for meeting professional colleagues from diverse institutions and fields of specialization and interests. I was able to discuss with these scientists, possibilities of research collaborations. Some of these people include but not limited to: Michael Watts (BGS); David Manning (on carbon-capturing); Ricardo Godoi (on Pollen & Hospitality); Paul Preton (on Brownfield Sciences); Khadija and Jane (on Household Dust); Alex Stewart (on Iodine Diseases in Nigeria, Nee Africa).

I am grateful for the SEGH bursary I received as an international participant from a developing country.

Presenting my poster at SEGH2019

Keep up to date

Submit Content

Members can keep in touch with their colleagues through short news and events articles of interest to the SEGH community.

Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Earthworms and vermicompost: an eco-friendly approach for repaying nature’s debt 2020-01-23

    Abstract

    The steady increase in the world’s population has intensified the need for crop productivity, but the majority of the agricultural practices are associated with adverse effects on the environment. Such undesired environmental outcomes may be mitigated by utilizing biological agents as part of farming practice. The present review article summarizes the analyses of the current status of global agriculture and soil scenarios; a description of the role of earthworms and their products as better biofertilizer; and suggestions for the rejuvenation of such technology despite significant lapses and gaps in research and extension programs. By maintaining a close collaboration with farmers, we have recognized a shift in their attitude and renewed optimism toward nature-based green technology. Based on these relations, it is inferred that the application of earthworm-mediated vermitechnology increases sustainable development by strengthening the underlying economic, social and ecological framework.

    Graphic abstract

  • Plasticizers and bisphenol A in Adyar and Cooum riverine sediments, India: occurrences, sources and risk assessment 2020-01-23

    Abstract

    Adyar and Cooum, the two rivers intersecting Chennai city, are exposed to serious pollution due to the release of large quantities of dumped waste, untreated wastewater and sewage. Sediments can act as repository for emerging organic contaminants. Hence, we have monitored the occurrence and risk associated with plasticizers [six phthalic acid esters (PAEs), bis(2-ethyl hexyl adipate) (DEHA)] and bisphenol A (BPA) in surface riverine sediments of Adyar and Cooum rivers from residential/commercial, industrial and electronic waste recycling sites. Σ7plasticizers (PAEs + DEHA) in the Adyar riverine sediment (ARS) and Cooum riverine sediment (CRS) varied between 51.82–1796 and 28.13–856 ng/g, respectively. More than three-fourth of Σ7plasticizers came from bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), in accordance with the high production and usage of this compound. BPA varied between 10.70–2026 and 7.58–1398 ng/g in ARS and CRS, respectively. Average concentrations of plasticizers and BPA were four times higher in electronic waste (e-waste) recycling sites when compared with industrial and residential/commercial sites. BPA and DEHP showed a strong and significant correlation (R2 = 0.7; p < 0.01) in the e-waste sites thereby indicating common source types. Sites present at close proximity to raw sewage pumping stations contributed to 70% of the total BPA observed in this study. For the derived pore water concentration of plasticizers and BPA, the ecotoxicological risk has been found to be higher in ARS over CRS. However, sediment concentrations in all the sites of ARS and CRS were much below the recommended serious risk concentration for human (SRChuman) and serious risk concentration for ecotoxicological (SRCeco).

  • Distribution of metal(loid)s in particle size fraction in urban soil and street dust: influence of population density 2020-01-18

    Abstract

    Assessment of street dust is an invaluable approach for monitoring atmospheric pollution. Little information is available on the size distribution of contaminants in street dusts and urban soils, and it is not known how the population density would influence them. This research was carried out to assess the size distribution of trace metal(loid)s in street dust and urban soil, and to understand how population density might influence the size-resolved concentration of metal(loid)s. Three urban areas with a high, medium and low population density and a natural area were selected and urban soil and street dust sampled. They were fractionated into 8 size fractions: 2000–850, 850–180, 180–106, 106–50, 50–20, 20–10, 10–2, and < 2 µm. The concentration of Pb, Zn, Cu, Cd, Cr, Ni, As, and Fe was determined, and enrichment factor and grain size fraction loadings were computed. The results indicated that the concentration of Pb, Zn, Cu, Cd, and Cr was highly size dependent, particularly for particles < 100 µm, especially for street dust. Low concentrations of Ni and As in street dust and urban soil were size and population density independent. Higher size dependency of the metals concentration and the higher degree of elemental enrichment in the street dust fractions than the urban soils indicate higher contribution of human-induced pollution to the dust. Findings also confirm the inevitability of size fractionation when soils or dusts are environmentally assessed, particularly in moderately to highly polluted areas. Otherwise, higher concentrations of certain pollutants in fine-sized particles might be overlooked leading to inappropriate decisions for environmental remediation.