SEGH Articles

SEGH Data Privacy Policy

01 June 2018
We are preparing for new General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR). Please read further for SEGH handling of member information.

SEGH Data Protection Policy

Who we are:

The Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health provides a forum for scientists from various disciplines to work together in understanding the interaction between the geochemical environment and the health of plants, animals and humans.

Further information can be found at: www.segh.net

What personal data we collect:

We collect personal data from subscribers comprising name, E-mail address and affiliation. We also collect the same information from individuals who attend our annual conference and other SEGH sponsored meetings.

What will we do with the data:

We will use this data to send subscribers email updates about SEGH, including upcoming events, the latest news articles on the website and other relevant information. For information held centrally by SEGH we will not share your data with other organisations.  The exception will be for a conference, for which specific permission will be sought by the conference host to share contact information with sponsors.

How we will store the data:

We will store your data in secure web hosting software, administered by our Webmaster, Membership Secretary, Secretary and President. We do not store financial details using the web hosting software.  Subscriptions are handled by off-site secure payments through SagePay, for which access to payment records are currently restricted to the Membership Secretary, Secretary and President.

How can i submit a 'Subject Access Request'?

You can submit a subject access request by E-mail to seghmembership@gmail.com

Will this privacy policy be updated?

We regularly review our policies, including this privacy policy, and may make changes from time to time.

Permission to maintain membership details

 Members can at any time request to be removed from the SEGH member/mailing list by emailing seghmembership@gmail.com .

Keep up to date

Submit Content

Members can keep in touch with their colleagues through short news and events articles of interest to the SEGH community.

Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Pesticides in the typical agricultural groundwater in Songnen plain, northeast China: occurrence, spatial distribution and health risks 2019-05-25

    Abstract

    Songnen plain is an important commodity grain base of China, and this is the first study on the comprehensive detection of multiple pesticides in groundwater. Based on an analytical method of 56 pesticides, 30 groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. At least 4 pesticides were detected in each sample and 32 out of 56 pesticides were detected. The average detected levels of individual pesticides were approximately 10–100 ng/L. Organophosphorus pesticides and carbamate pesticides were the dominant pesticides, and their percentage of total pesticide concentrations were 35.9% and 55.5%, respectively. Based on the spatial distribution, the characteristic of nonpoint source pollution was indicated in the whole study area except for a point source pollution with the influence of a sewage oxidation pond. Nine core pesticides and three distinct clusters of the core pesticides with various concentration patterns were revealed by cluster analysis. Linear regression identified a significant relationship between the cumulative detections and the cumulative concentrations, providing access to identify the outlying contaminant events that deviate substantially from the linear trend. A new insight for prediction of pesticide occurrence was provided by the Pearson correlation between some individual pesticide concentrations and the cumulative detections or the cumulative concentrations. According to health risk assessment, the residual pesticides posed medium risks for children and infants and approximately 90% of risks were composed of β-HCH, dimethoate, ethyl-p-nitrophenyl phenylphosphonothioate and methyl parathion. These findings contributed to establishing a database for future monitoring and control of pesticides in agricultural areas.

  • Correction to: Potential CO 2 intrusion in near-surface environments: a review of current research approaches to geochemical processes 2019-05-22

    In the original publication of the article, the third author name has been misspelt. The correct name is given in this correction. The original version of this article was revised.

  • The legacy of industrial pollution in estuarine sediments: spatial and temporal variability implications for ecosystem stress 2019-05-22

    Abstract

    The direct impacts of anthropogenic pollution are widely known public and environmental health concerns, and details on the indirect impact of these are starting to emerge, for example affecting the environmental microbiome. Anthropogenic activities throughout history with associated pollution burdens are notable contributors. Focusing on the historically heavily industrialised River Clyde, Scotland, we investigate spatial and temporal contributions to stressful/hostile environments using a geochemical framework, e.g. pH, EC, total organic carbon and potentially toxic elements: As, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn and enrichment indicators. With regular breaches of the sediment quality standards in the estuarine system we focused on PTE correlations instead. Multivariate statistical analysis (principle component analysis) identifies two dominant components, PC1: As, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn, as well as PC2: Ni, Co and total organic carbon. Our assessment confirms hot spots in the Clyde Estuary indicative of localised inputs. In addition, there are sites with high variability indicative of excessive mixing. We demonstrate that industrialised areas are dynamic environmental sites dependant on historical anthropogenic activity with short-scale variation. This work supports the development of ‘contamination’ mapping to enable an assessment of the impact of historical anthropogenic pollution, identifying specific ‘stressors’ that can impact the microbiome, neglecting in estuarine recovery dynamics and potentially supporting the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in the environment.