SEGH Articles

SEGH International Conference, Guangzhou, China 2017

24 May 2018
The 33rd International conference of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH 2017) was successfully held in Guangzhou, China

 

SEGH 2017 Closing Ceremony

Delegates attend the Closing Ceremony of SEGH 2017 in Guangzhou, China

The 33rd international conference of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH 2017) was successfully held in Guangzhou, China between June 30th – July 4th, 2017. This conference was hosted by the Guangdong University of Technology and the Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS, China. Approximately 550 abstracts were submitted and grouped into 27 sessions. More than 500 delegates came from 27 countries and regions. Three academics and four distinguished scientists from Europe, USA and China delivered plenary lectures. Seventy seven keynote speakers as well as 90 invited speakers were in attendance. In addition, 66 volunteers from local universities provided great service for this conference. Based on this exciting conference, a virtual special issue, including 20 full-length submitted papers on Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, was organized. Ten Best Poster Prizes were awarded by the conference with the support of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and Elsevier publishers. A selection of photographs from the converence are provided below.

Dr. Chaosheng Zhang, delivers a welcome remark

Dr Chaosheng Zhang gives a welcome address to delegates

Prof. Taicheng An introduces SEGH 2017

Prof Taicheng An, Chair of SEGH 2017, intorduces the event and welcomes delegates

The president of Guangdong University of Technology

Prof Xin Chen, President of Guangdong University of Technology, gives a welcoming address

Prof. Shu Tao, Academic from the Chinese Academy of Sciences

Prof Shu Tao from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) delivers a plenary lecture

The plenary lecture of SEGH 2017

Delegates attend a plenary session

Delegates at SEGH 2017

Captivated delegates listening intently to a plenary lecture

Poster Prize Ceremony, SEGH 2017

Poster Prizes are presented. Many congratulations to: 

 
Yuling Wu, Xiamen University, China: Temporal Trends And Transport of Perfluorinated Compounds (PFCs) in A Subtropical Estuary: Jiulong River Estuary, China
 
Weijun Tian, Ocean University of China, China: Application of Cinder gel-beads/reeds Combination Strategy for Bioremediation of High Molecular Weight PAHs- Contaminated Estuarine Wetlands
 
Yuechang Wei, China University of Petroleum, Beijing, China: Novel Active Structure of Noble Metal-Oxides on 3DOM Oxides with Enhanced Catalytic Activity for Soot Oxidation
 
Honghong Wang, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS, China: Theoretical Investigation of Formaldehyde Adsorption on the Anatase TiO2 (101) Surface
 
Weigang Wang, Institute of Chemistry, CAS, China: Optical Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosols Derived From Long-Chain Alkanes under Various Nox and Seed Conditions
 
Yuanhong Zhong, Guangdong University of Technology, China: Facile Synthesis of Chromium Substituted Magnetite Nanorods with High Performance of Heterogeneous UVA-LED/Fenton Catalytic Activity
 
Wanbing Gong, Institute of Solid State Physics, CAS, China: H2-Hydrogenation/Transfer Hydrogenation of Bio-Derived Furfural using Sulfonate Group Modified (Cu, Ni) Catalysts
 
Haibo Yin, Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science Graduate School of Engineering, China: High-surface-area Plasmonic MoO3-x: Rational Synthesis and Enhanced Ammonia Borane Dehydrogenation Activity
 
Shang Chen, Central China Normal University, China: Promoted Surface Oxygen Vacancy Regeneration for Sustainable Molecular Oxygen Activation on BiOCl Facets via Phosphoric Acid Modification
 
Xiaoran Wei, Shandong University: The Effect of Silica Nanoparticles on Phospholipid Membrane Fluidity


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Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Distribution pattern and health risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the water and sediment of Algoa Bay, South Africa 2018-11-11

    Abstract

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are amongst the pollutants of major concern in the terrestrial and aquatic habitats. They are mostly characterised by carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects. Distribution and potential health risks of sixteen priority PAHs in the water and sediment samples collected between December 2015 and June 2016 from Algoa Bay, South Africa, were evaluated. Water and sediment samples collected were extracted with liquid–liquid and soxhlet extraction methods, respectively, and then cleaned up using glass column loaded with silica gel. Final concentrations of the target PAHs were determined by gas chromatography interfaced with flame ionization detector. Results indicated that individual PAH concentrations in surface water, bottom water and sediment samples ranged from not detected (ND) to 24.66 µg/L, ND to 22.81 µg/L and ND to 5.23 mg/kg correspondingly. Total PAHs concentrations varied as 12.78–78.94 µg/L, 1.20–90.51 µg/L and 1.17–10.47 mg/kg in the three environmental matrices in that order. The non-carcinogenic risk was generally below 1, whereas risk indices (dermal contact) were above the acceptable limit of 1 × 10−4 in the water column, suggesting possible carcinogenic effects to humans, with adults being the most vulnerable. Similarly, highest contributions to TEQs and MEQs in the sediments were made by benzo(a)pyrene and dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, the two most toxic congeners, signifying the possibility of carcinogenicity and mutagenicity in humans. Diagnostic ratios of PAHs reflect a prevailing pyrogenic input all through. The pollution was albeit moderate, yet regular check is recommended to ensure safe and healthy environment for human and aquatic lives.

  • Potential exposure to metals and health risks of metal intake from Tieguanyin tea production in Anxi, China 2018-11-10

    Abstract

    The metal content of Tieguanyin tea from Anxi, Southeast China, was studied. Leaching experiments were designed based on the local tea-drinking habits, and tea infusions were prepared using three types of water and two methods of soaking tea. Twelve metals (Cd, As, Cr, Pb, Se, Sb, Ag, Tl, Cu, Zn, Be, and Ba) were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and a human health risk assessment was performed. The results showed that the quality of water used for steeping tea has a direct effect on the leaching concentrations of metals in the tea infusion and this effect can be reduced by using pure water or commercially available drinking water. Further, the two tea-soaking methods used by local residents can reduce the metal intake. The health risk assessment determined that the carcinogenic risk values of Cr, As, and Pb (Cr > Pb > As) were within an acceptable range (10−7–10−4); therefore, the concentrations of these metals in tea infusions do not pose substantial carcinogenic risk to tea drinkers. The results also indicate that the high concentrations of Tl in the tea infusions pose a substantial noncarcinogenic risk and may result from the dissolution characteristics of Tl and the water quality.

  • Health risk assessment and source apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons associated with PM 10 and road deposited dust in Ahvaz metropolis of Iran 2018-11-09

    Abstract

    The objective of this study was to compare the characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PM10 and road dust samples, as well as to identify and quantify the contributions of each source profile using the positive matrix factorization (PMF) receptor model. Health risk assessment was carried out using toxic equivalency factors and incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR), which quantitatively estimate the exposure risk for age-specific groups. PM10 samples were collected on PTFE filters in the metropolitan area of Ahvaz. Road dust samples were also collected from all over the urban areas with different land uses. Total PAH concentrations in PM10 and road dust samples were 0.5–25.5 ng/m3 and 49.3–16,645 µg/kg, respectively. Pyrene was the highest PAH in the PM10 profile, whereas fluoranthene became the highest PAH in the road dust. Abundance of benzo[ghi]perylene at PM10 and road dust samples suggested a source indicator for traffic emissions. The results demonstrate that in 36.5% of samples, PM10 concentrations exceed the maximum concentration level recommended by EPA. A multiple linear regression model was used to estimate the influence of meteorological parameters (temperature, wind speed, and relative humidity) on buildup of PAHs. All of PAH species show higher concentrations during the cold and typical days rather than the dust event days and warm periods. PMF analysis showed that vehicular emissions (50.6%) and industrial activities (especially steel industries) (30.4%) were first two sources of PAHs bounded with PM10, followed by diesel emissions (11.6%) and air–soil exchange (7.4%). For road dust samples, three common sources were also identified: vehicular traffic (48%), industrial activities (42.3%), and petrogenic sources (9.7%), in line with that of diagnostic molecular ratios results. According to the results of health risk assessment model, the ILCR of exposure to PAHs associated with PM10 and road-deposited dust was higher than the guidelines of USEPA, indicating high carcinogenic risk.