SEGH Articles

SEGH International Conference, Guangzhou, China 2017

24 May 2018
The 33rd International conference of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH 2017) was successfully held in Guangzhou, China

 

SEGH 2017 Closing Ceremony

Delegates attend the Closing Ceremony of SEGH 2017 in Guangzhou, China

The 33rd international conference of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH 2017) was successfully held in Guangzhou, China between June 30th – July 4th, 2017. This conference was hosted by the Guangdong University of Technology and the Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS, China. Approximately 550 abstracts were submitted and grouped into 27 sessions. More than 500 delegates came from 27 countries and regions. Three academics and four distinguished scientists from Europe, USA and China delivered plenary lectures. Seventy seven keynote speakers as well as 90 invited speakers were in attendance. In addition, 66 volunteers from local universities provided great service for this conference. Based on this exciting conference, a virtual special issue, including 20 full-length submitted papers on Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, was organized. Ten Best Poster Prizes were awarded by the conference with the support of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and Elsevier publishers. A selection of photographs from the converence are provided below.

Dr. Chaosheng Zhang, delivers a welcome remark

Dr Chaosheng Zhang gives a welcome address to delegates

Prof. Taicheng An introduces SEGH 2017

Prof Taicheng An, Chair of SEGH 2017, intorduces the event and welcomes delegates

The president of Guangdong University of Technology

Prof Xin Chen, President of Guangdong University of Technology, gives a welcoming address

Prof. Shu Tao, Academic from the Chinese Academy of Sciences

Prof Shu Tao from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) delivers a plenary lecture

The plenary lecture of SEGH 2017

Delegates attend a plenary session

Delegates at SEGH 2017

Captivated delegates listening intently to a plenary lecture

Poster Prize Ceremony, SEGH 2017

Poster Prizes are presented. Many congratulations to: 

 
Yuling Wu, Xiamen University, China: Temporal Trends And Transport of Perfluorinated Compounds (PFCs) in A Subtropical Estuary: Jiulong River Estuary, China
 
Weijun Tian, Ocean University of China, China: Application of Cinder gel-beads/reeds Combination Strategy for Bioremediation of High Molecular Weight PAHs- Contaminated Estuarine Wetlands
 
Yuechang Wei, China University of Petroleum, Beijing, China: Novel Active Structure of Noble Metal-Oxides on 3DOM Oxides with Enhanced Catalytic Activity for Soot Oxidation
 
Honghong Wang, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS, China: Theoretical Investigation of Formaldehyde Adsorption on the Anatase TiO2 (101) Surface
 
Weigang Wang, Institute of Chemistry, CAS, China: Optical Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosols Derived From Long-Chain Alkanes under Various Nox and Seed Conditions
 
Yuanhong Zhong, Guangdong University of Technology, China: Facile Synthesis of Chromium Substituted Magnetite Nanorods with High Performance of Heterogeneous UVA-LED/Fenton Catalytic Activity
 
Wanbing Gong, Institute of Solid State Physics, CAS, China: H2-Hydrogenation/Transfer Hydrogenation of Bio-Derived Furfural using Sulfonate Group Modified (Cu, Ni) Catalysts
 
Haibo Yin, Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science Graduate School of Engineering, China: High-surface-area Plasmonic MoO3-x: Rational Synthesis and Enhanced Ammonia Borane Dehydrogenation Activity
 
Shang Chen, Central China Normal University, China: Promoted Surface Oxygen Vacancy Regeneration for Sustainable Molecular Oxygen Activation on BiOCl Facets via Phosphoric Acid Modification
 
Xiaoran Wei, Shandong University: The Effect of Silica Nanoparticles on Phospholipid Membrane Fluidity


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Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Fertilizer usage and cadmium in soils, crops and food 2018-06-23

    Abstract

    Phosphate fertilizers were first implicated by Schroeder and Balassa (Science 140(3568):819–820, 1963) for increasing the Cd concentration in cultivated soils and crops. This suggestion has become a part of the accepted paradigm on soil toxicity. Consequently, stringent fertilizer control programs to monitor Cd have been launched. Attempts to link Cd toxicity and fertilizers to chronic diseases, sometimes with good evidence, but mostly on less certain data are frequent. A re-assessment of this “accepted” paradigm is timely, given the larger body of data available today. The data show that both the input and output of Cd per hectare from fertilizers are negligibly small compared to the total amount of Cd/hectare usually present in the soil itself. Calculations based on current agricultural practices are used to show that it will take centuries to double the ambient soil Cd level, even after neglecting leaching and other removal effects. The concern of long-term agriculture should be the depletion of available phosphate fertilizers, rather than the negligible contamination of the soil by trace metals from fertilizer inputs. This conclusion is confirmed by showing that the claimed correlations between fertilizer input and Cd accumulation in crops are not robust. Alternative scenarios that explain the data are presented. Thus, soil acidulation on fertilizer loading and the effect of Mg, Zn and F ions contained in fertilizers are considered using recent \(\hbox {Cd}^{2+}\) , \(\hbox {Mg}^{2+}\) and \(\hbox {F}^-\) ion-association theories. The protective role of ions like Zn, Se, Fe is emphasized, and the question of Cd toxicity in the presence of other ions is considered. These help to clarify difficulties in the standard point of view. This analysis does not modify the accepted views on Cd contamination by airborne delivery, smoking, and industrial activity, or algal blooms caused by phosphates.

  • Effects of conversion of mangroves into gei wai ponds on accumulation, speciation and risk of heavy metals in intertidal sediments 2018-06-23

    Abstract

    Mangroves are often converted into gei wai ponds for aquaculture, but how such conversion affects the accumulation and behavior of heavy metals in sediments is not clear. The present study aims to quantify the concentration and speciation of heavy metals in sediments in different habitats, including gei wai pond, mangrove marsh dominated by Avicennia marina and bare mudflat, in a mangrove nature reserve in South China. The results showed that gei wai pond acidified the sediment and reduced its electronic conductivity and total organic carbon (TOC) when compared to A. marina marsh and mudflat. The concentrations of Cd, Cu, Zn and Pb at all sediment depths in gei wai pond were lower than the other habitats, indicating gei wai pond reduced the fertility and the ability to retain heavy metals in sediment. Gei wai pond sediment also had a lower heavy metal pollution problem according to multiple evaluation methods, including potential ecological risk coefficient, potential ecological risk index, geo-accumulation index, mean PEL quotients, pollution load index, mean ERM quotients and total toxic unit. Heavy metal speciation analysis showed that gei wai pond increased the transfer of the immobilized fraction of Cd and Cr to the mobilized one. According to the acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) analysis, the conversion of mangroves into gei wai pond reduced values of ([SEM] − [AVS])/f oc , and the role of TOC in alleviating heavy metal toxicity in sediment. This study demonstrated the conversion of mangrove marsh into gei wai pond not only reduced the ecological purification capacity on heavy metal contamination, but also enhanced the transfer of heavy metals from gei wai pond sediment to nearby habitats.

  • Cytotoxicity induced by the mixture components of nickel and poly aromatic hydrocarbons 2018-06-22

    Abstract

    Although particulate matter (PM) is composed of various chemicals, investigations regarding the toxicity that results from mixing the substances in PM are insufficient. In this study, the effects of low levels of three PAHs (benz[a]anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene, and dibenz[a,h]anthracene) on Ni toxicity were investigated to assess the combined effect of Ni–PAHs on the environment. We compared the difference in cell mortality and total glutathione (tGSH) reduction between single Ni and Ni–PAHs co-exposure using A549 (human alveolar carcinoma). In addition, we measured the change in Ni solubility in chloroform that was triggered by PAHs to confirm the existence of cation–π interactions between Ni and PAHs. In the single Ni exposure, the dose–response curve of cell mortality and tGSH reduction were very similar, indicating that cell death was mediated by the oxidative stress. However, 10 μM PAHs induced a depleted tGSH reduction compared to single Ni without a change in cell mortality. The solubility of Ni in chloroform was greatly enhanced by the addition of benz[a]anthracene, which demonstrates the cation–π interactions between Ni and PAHs. Ni–PAH complexes can change the toxicity mechanisms of Ni from oxidative stress to others due to the reduction of Ni2+ bioavailability and the accumulation of Ni–PAH complexes on cell membranes. The abundant PAHs contained in PM have strong potential to interact with metals, which can affect the toxicity of the metal. Therefore, the mixture toxicity and interactions between diverse metals and PAHs in PM should be investigated in the future.