SEGH Articles

SEGH International Conference, Guangzhou, China 2017

24 May 2018
The 33rd International conference of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH 2017) was successfully held in Guangzhou, China

 

SEGH 2017 Closing Ceremony

Delegates attend the Closing Ceremony of SEGH 2017 in Guangzhou, China

The 33rd international conference of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH 2017) was successfully held in Guangzhou, China between June 30th – July 4th, 2017. This conference was hosted by the Guangdong University of Technology and the Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS, China. Approximately 550 abstracts were submitted and grouped into 27 sessions. More than 500 delegates came from 27 countries and regions. Three academics and four distinguished scientists from Europe, USA and China delivered plenary lectures. Seventy seven keynote speakers as well as 90 invited speakers were in attendance. In addition, 66 volunteers from local universities provided great service for this conference. Based on this exciting conference, a virtual special issue, including 20 full-length submitted papers on Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, was organized. Ten Best Poster Prizes were awarded by the conference with the support of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and Elsevier publishers. A selection of photographs from the converence are provided below.

Dr. Chaosheng Zhang, delivers a welcome remark

Dr Chaosheng Zhang gives a welcome address to delegates

Prof. Taicheng An introduces SEGH 2017

Prof Taicheng An, Chair of SEGH 2017, intorduces the event and welcomes delegates

The president of Guangdong University of Technology

Prof Xin Chen, President of Guangdong University of Technology, gives a welcoming address

Prof. Shu Tao, Academic from the Chinese Academy of Sciences

Prof Shu Tao from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) delivers a plenary lecture

The plenary lecture of SEGH 2017

Delegates attend a plenary session

Delegates at SEGH 2017

Captivated delegates listening intently to a plenary lecture

Poster Prize Ceremony, SEGH 2017

Poster Prizes are presented. Many congratulations to: 

 
Yuling Wu, Xiamen University, China: Temporal Trends And Transport of Perfluorinated Compounds (PFCs) in A Subtropical Estuary: Jiulong River Estuary, China
 
Weijun Tian, Ocean University of China, China: Application of Cinder gel-beads/reeds Combination Strategy for Bioremediation of High Molecular Weight PAHs- Contaminated Estuarine Wetlands
 
Yuechang Wei, China University of Petroleum, Beijing, China: Novel Active Structure of Noble Metal-Oxides on 3DOM Oxides with Enhanced Catalytic Activity for Soot Oxidation
 
Honghong Wang, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS, China: Theoretical Investigation of Formaldehyde Adsorption on the Anatase TiO2 (101) Surface
 
Weigang Wang, Institute of Chemistry, CAS, China: Optical Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosols Derived From Long-Chain Alkanes under Various Nox and Seed Conditions
 
Yuanhong Zhong, Guangdong University of Technology, China: Facile Synthesis of Chromium Substituted Magnetite Nanorods with High Performance of Heterogeneous UVA-LED/Fenton Catalytic Activity
 
Wanbing Gong, Institute of Solid State Physics, CAS, China: H2-Hydrogenation/Transfer Hydrogenation of Bio-Derived Furfural using Sulfonate Group Modified (Cu, Ni) Catalysts
 
Haibo Yin, Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science Graduate School of Engineering, China: High-surface-area Plasmonic MoO3-x: Rational Synthesis and Enhanced Ammonia Borane Dehydrogenation Activity
 
Shang Chen, Central China Normal University, China: Promoted Surface Oxygen Vacancy Regeneration for Sustainable Molecular Oxygen Activation on BiOCl Facets via Phosphoric Acid Modification
 
Xiaoran Wei, Shandong University: The Effect of Silica Nanoparticles on Phospholipid Membrane Fluidity


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Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Arsenic exposure and perception of health risk due to groundwater contamination in Majuli (river island), Assam, India 2019-07-19

    Abstract

    Island populations are rarely studied for risk of arsenic (As) poisoning. As poisoning, multimetal contamination and people’s perceptions of health risks were assessed on India’s Majuli Island, the largest inhabited river island in the world. This holistic approach illustrated the association of groundwater contamination status with consequent health risk by measuring levels of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in groundwater, borehole sediment and biological samples (hair, nails and urine). Piper and Gibbs’s plots discerned the underlying hydrogeochemical processes in the aquifer. Demographic data and qualitative factors were evaluated to assess the risks and uncertainties of exposure. The results exhibited significant enrichment of groundwater with As, Mn and Fe along with significant body burden. Maximum Hazard Index values indicated severe non-carcinogenic health impacts as well as a significantly elevated risk of cancer for both adults and children. Most (99%) of the locally affected population did not know about the adverse health impacts of metal contamination, and only 15% understood bodily ailments and health issues. Various aspects of the island environment were used to elucidate the status of contamination and future risk of disease. A projection showed adverse health outcomes rising significantly, especially among the young population of Majuli, due to overexposure to not only As but also Ba, Mn and Fe.

  • The contents of the potentially harmful elements in the arable soils of southern Poland, with the assessment of ecological and health risks: a case study 2019-07-19

    Abstract

    Agricultural soil samples were collected from the areas where edible plants had been cultivated in southern Poland. The PHE content decreased in proportion to the median value specified in brackets (mg/kg d.m.) as follows: Zn (192) > Pb (47.1) > Cr (19.6) > Cu (18.8) > Ni (9.91) > As (5.73) > Co (4.63) > Sb (0.85) > Tl (0.04) > Cd (0.03) > Hg (0.001) > Se (< LOQ). No PHE concentrations exceeded the permissible levels defined in the Polish law. The PHE solubility (extracted with CaCl2) in the total concentration ranged in the following order: Fe (3.3%) > Cd (2.50%) > Ni (0.75%) > Zn (0.48%) > Cu (0.19%) > Pb (0.10%) > Cr (0.03%). The soil contamination indices revealed moderate contamination with Zn, ranging from uncontaminated to moderately contaminated with Pb, and, practically, no contamination with other PHEs was identified. The ecological risk indices revealed that soils ranged from uncontaminated to slightly contaminated with Zn, Pb, As, Cu, and Ni. The PCA indicated natural sources of origin of Co, Cu, Hg, Sb, Zn, Cr, and Pb, as well as anthropogenic sources of origin of Cd, Ni, As, and Tl. The human health risk assessment (HHRA) for adults and children decreased in the following order of exposure pathways: ingestion > dermal contact > inhalation of soil particles. The total carcinogenic risk values for both adults and children were at the acceptable level under residential (1.62E−05 and 6.39E−05) and recreational scenario (5.41E−06 and 2.46E−05), respectively, as well as for adults in agricultural scenario (1.45E−05). The total non-carcinogenic risk values for both adults and children under residential scenario (1.63E−01 and 4.55E−01, respectively), under recreational scenario (2.88E−01 and 6.69E−01, respectively) and for adults (1.03E−01) under agricultural scenario indicated that adverse health effects were not likely to be observed. Investigated soils were fully suitable for edible plant cultivation.

  • Using human hair and nails as biomarkers to assess exposure of potentially harmful elements to populations living near mine waste dumps 2019-07-17

    Abstract

    Potentially harmful elements (PHEs) manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) were measured in human hair/nails, staple crops and drinking water to ascertain the level of exposure to dust transference via wind and rain erosion for members of the Mugala community living near a mine waste dump in the Zambian Copperbelt. The mean PHE concentrations of hair in decreasing order were Zn (137 ± 21 mg/kg), Cu (38 ± 7 mg/kg), Mn (16 ± 2 mg/kg), Pb (4.3 ± 1.9 mg/kg), Ni (1.3 ± 0.2 mg/kg) and Cr (1.2 ± 0.2 mg/kg), Co (0.9 ± 0.2 mg/kg) and Cd (0.30 ± 0.02 mg/kg). Whilst for toenails the decreasing order of mean concentrations was Zn (172 ± 27 mg/kg), Cu (30 ± 5 mg/kg), Mn (12 ± 2 mg/kg), Pb (4.8 ± 0.5 mg/kg), Ni (1.7 ± 0.14 mg/kg) and Co (1.0 ± 0.02 mg/kg), Cr (0.6 ± 0.1 mg/kg) and Cd (0.1 ± 0.002 mg/kg). The concentration of these potentially harmful elements (PHEs) varied greatly among different age groups. The results showed that Mn, Co, Pb, Cd and Zn were above the interval values (Biolab in Nutritional and environmental medicine, Hair Mineral Analysis, London, 2012) at 0.2–2.0 mg/kg for Mn, 0.01–0.20 mg/kg for Co, < 2.00 mg/kg for Pb, < 0.10 mg/kg for Cd and 0.2–2.00 mg/kg for Zn, whilst Ni, Cu and Cr concentrations were within the normal range concentrations of < 1.40 mg/kg, 10–100 mg/kg and 0.1–1.5 mg/kg, respectively. Dietary intake of PHEs was assessed from the ingestion of vegetables grown in Mugala village, with estimated PHE intakes expressed on a daily basis calculated for Mn (255), Pb (48), Ni (149) and Cd (33) µg/kg bw/day. For these metals, DI via vegetables was above the proposed limits of the provisional tolerable daily intakes (PTDIs) (WHO in Evaluation of certain food additive and contaminants, Seventy-third report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives, 2011) for Mn at 70 µg/kg bw/day, Pb at 3 µg/kg bw/day, Ni and Cd 5 µg/kg bw/day and 1 µg/kg bw/day, respectively. The rest of the PHEs listed were within the PTDIs limits. Therefore, Mugala inhabitants are at imminent health risk due to lead, nickel and cadmium ingestion of vegetables and drinking water at this location.