SEGH Articles

SEGH International Conference, Guangzhou, China 2017

24 May 2018
The 33rd International conference of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH 2017) was successfully held in Guangzhou, China

 

SEGH 2017 Closing Ceremony

Delegates attend the Closing Ceremony of SEGH 2017 in Guangzhou, China

The 33rd international conference of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH 2017) was successfully held in Guangzhou, China between June 30th – July 4th, 2017. This conference was hosted by the Guangdong University of Technology and the Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS, China. Approximately 550 abstracts were submitted and grouped into 27 sessions. More than 500 delegates came from 27 countries and regions. Three academics and four distinguished scientists from Europe, USA and China delivered plenary lectures. Seventy seven keynote speakers as well as 90 invited speakers were in attendance. In addition, 66 volunteers from local universities provided great service for this conference. Based on this exciting conference, a virtual special issue, including 20 full-length submitted papers on Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, was organized. Ten Best Poster Prizes were awarded by the conference with the support of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and Elsevier publishers. A selection of photographs from the converence are provided below.

Dr. Chaosheng Zhang, delivers a welcome remark

Dr Chaosheng Zhang gives a welcome address to delegates

Prof. Taicheng An introduces SEGH 2017

Prof Taicheng An, Chair of SEGH 2017, intorduces the event and welcomes delegates

The president of Guangdong University of Technology

Prof Xin Chen, President of Guangdong University of Technology, gives a welcoming address

Prof. Shu Tao, Academic from the Chinese Academy of Sciences

Prof Shu Tao from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) delivers a plenary lecture

The plenary lecture of SEGH 2017

Delegates attend a plenary session

Delegates at SEGH 2017

Captivated delegates listening intently to a plenary lecture

Poster Prize Ceremony, SEGH 2017

Poster Prizes are presented. Many congratulations to: 

 
Yuling Wu, Xiamen University, China: Temporal Trends And Transport of Perfluorinated Compounds (PFCs) in A Subtropical Estuary: Jiulong River Estuary, China
 
Weijun Tian, Ocean University of China, China: Application of Cinder gel-beads/reeds Combination Strategy for Bioremediation of High Molecular Weight PAHs- Contaminated Estuarine Wetlands
 
Yuechang Wei, China University of Petroleum, Beijing, China: Novel Active Structure of Noble Metal-Oxides on 3DOM Oxides with Enhanced Catalytic Activity for Soot Oxidation
 
Honghong Wang, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS, China: Theoretical Investigation of Formaldehyde Adsorption on the Anatase TiO2 (101) Surface
 
Weigang Wang, Institute of Chemistry, CAS, China: Optical Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosols Derived From Long-Chain Alkanes under Various Nox and Seed Conditions
 
Yuanhong Zhong, Guangdong University of Technology, China: Facile Synthesis of Chromium Substituted Magnetite Nanorods with High Performance of Heterogeneous UVA-LED/Fenton Catalytic Activity
 
Wanbing Gong, Institute of Solid State Physics, CAS, China: H2-Hydrogenation/Transfer Hydrogenation of Bio-Derived Furfural using Sulfonate Group Modified (Cu, Ni) Catalysts
 
Haibo Yin, Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science Graduate School of Engineering, China: High-surface-area Plasmonic MoO3-x: Rational Synthesis and Enhanced Ammonia Borane Dehydrogenation Activity
 
Shang Chen, Central China Normal University, China: Promoted Surface Oxygen Vacancy Regeneration for Sustainable Molecular Oxygen Activation on BiOCl Facets via Phosphoric Acid Modification
 
Xiaoran Wei, Shandong University: The Effect of Silica Nanoparticles on Phospholipid Membrane Fluidity


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Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Earthworms and vermicompost: an eco-friendly approach for repaying nature’s debt 2020-01-23

    Abstract

    The steady increase in the world’s population has intensified the need for crop productivity, but the majority of the agricultural practices are associated with adverse effects on the environment. Such undesired environmental outcomes may be mitigated by utilizing biological agents as part of farming practice. The present review article summarizes the analyses of the current status of global agriculture and soil scenarios; a description of the role of earthworms and their products as better biofertilizer; and suggestions for the rejuvenation of such technology despite significant lapses and gaps in research and extension programs. By maintaining a close collaboration with farmers, we have recognized a shift in their attitude and renewed optimism toward nature-based green technology. Based on these relations, it is inferred that the application of earthworm-mediated vermitechnology increases sustainable development by strengthening the underlying economic, social and ecological framework.

    Graphic abstract

  • Plasticizers and bisphenol A in Adyar and Cooum riverine sediments, India: occurrences, sources and risk assessment 2020-01-23

    Abstract

    Adyar and Cooum, the two rivers intersecting Chennai city, are exposed to serious pollution due to the release of large quantities of dumped waste, untreated wastewater and sewage. Sediments can act as repository for emerging organic contaminants. Hence, we have monitored the occurrence and risk associated with plasticizers [six phthalic acid esters (PAEs), bis(2-ethyl hexyl adipate) (DEHA)] and bisphenol A (BPA) in surface riverine sediments of Adyar and Cooum rivers from residential/commercial, industrial and electronic waste recycling sites. Σ7plasticizers (PAEs + DEHA) in the Adyar riverine sediment (ARS) and Cooum riverine sediment (CRS) varied between 51.82–1796 and 28.13–856 ng/g, respectively. More than three-fourth of Σ7plasticizers came from bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), in accordance with the high production and usage of this compound. BPA varied between 10.70–2026 and 7.58–1398 ng/g in ARS and CRS, respectively. Average concentrations of plasticizers and BPA were four times higher in electronic waste (e-waste) recycling sites when compared with industrial and residential/commercial sites. BPA and DEHP showed a strong and significant correlation (R2 = 0.7; p < 0.01) in the e-waste sites thereby indicating common source types. Sites present at close proximity to raw sewage pumping stations contributed to 70% of the total BPA observed in this study. For the derived pore water concentration of plasticizers and BPA, the ecotoxicological risk has been found to be higher in ARS over CRS. However, sediment concentrations in all the sites of ARS and CRS were much below the recommended serious risk concentration for human (SRChuman) and serious risk concentration for ecotoxicological (SRCeco).

  • Distribution of metal(loid)s in particle size fraction in urban soil and street dust: influence of population density 2020-01-18

    Abstract

    Assessment of street dust is an invaluable approach for monitoring atmospheric pollution. Little information is available on the size distribution of contaminants in street dusts and urban soils, and it is not known how the population density would influence them. This research was carried out to assess the size distribution of trace metal(loid)s in street dust and urban soil, and to understand how population density might influence the size-resolved concentration of metal(loid)s. Three urban areas with a high, medium and low population density and a natural area were selected and urban soil and street dust sampled. They were fractionated into 8 size fractions: 2000–850, 850–180, 180–106, 106–50, 50–20, 20–10, 10–2, and < 2 µm. The concentration of Pb, Zn, Cu, Cd, Cr, Ni, As, and Fe was determined, and enrichment factor and grain size fraction loadings were computed. The results indicated that the concentration of Pb, Zn, Cu, Cd, and Cr was highly size dependent, particularly for particles < 100 µm, especially for street dust. Low concentrations of Ni and As in street dust and urban soil were size and population density independent. Higher size dependency of the metals concentration and the higher degree of elemental enrichment in the street dust fractions than the urban soils indicate higher contribution of human-induced pollution to the dust. Findings also confirm the inevitability of size fractionation when soils or dusts are environmentally assessed, particularly in moderately to highly polluted areas. Otherwise, higher concentrations of certain pollutants in fine-sized particles might be overlooked leading to inappropriate decisions for environmental remediation.