SEGH Articles

34th SEGH International Conference on Geochemistry for Sustainable Development

26 November 2017
AVANI Victoria Falls Resort, Livingstone, Zambia 2-7th July 2018. Registrations now open.

We cordially invite SEGH members and new friends to join the SEGH 2018 conference next to Victoria Falls in Livingstone, Zambia. Please view the conference website for details https://segh2018.org/ .

These are exciting times for African development across many sectors, including rapid technological advancement in I.T. and communications, Agriculture, Public Health, Mining and infrastructure development, alongside rapid urbanisation.  The scientific fields represented by SEGH are presented with challenges/opportunities to provide scientific information to the general public, government, industry and donor stakeholders.  The 34th SEGH International Conference is therefore organised around four themes under the banner of ‘Geochemistry for Sustainable Development’:

Theme 1. Industrial and Urban Development

Theme 2. Agriculture

Theme 3. Health

Theme 4. Technologies

More information around these themes can be found on the conference webpage.

You will find additional information about the conference venue, location, how to get to Livingstone, surrounding town and opportunities for experiencing the natural wonder of Victoria Falls.  In addition, we have posted some information on suggestions for local accommodation for a range of budgets to which we will keep you updated as we confirm discounts with local accommodation via: https://segh2018.org/, twitter on @SocEGH, @segh2018, www.segh.net updates and member emails.  On the conference website you will find information for registration and submission of abstracts.  Delegate payments will be handled in two ways.  Zambian nationals and sponsors to pay via the Zambian online shop, international delegates and sponsors to pay via the International online shop which will connect to the SEGH secure payment function using SagePay. Bank transfers can be made on request.

Sponsors and exhibitors are very welcome to support the conference and enrich the meeting by showcasing their capabilities.  This conference presents a unique opportunity to reach a number of delegates from across the world and African region, spanning multi-disciplinary science as shown by the themes, drawn from academia, government agencies, NGOs and industry.

We have formulated a comprehensive social programme including the ice-breaker-registration, two poster evenings, each with drinks, food and music and the conference dinner (Boma) which will be held on the banks of the Zambezi in site of the edge of Victoria Falls. A braai (barbecue) will be provided at the Boma along with entertainment including traditional dancing and music. With support from sponsors, we aim to keep these costs within the registration fee.  See https://segh2018.org/

July 3-5th will comprise of conference presentations, whilst the 6th July will be offered to delegates as a free training day.  Details are shown on the conference website, please feel free to suggest other ideas or volunteer to run small working groups. On the 7th July will be a field trip to visit an African cultural centre, Agricultural research station and finish with a sunset cruise on the Zambezi.  We just ask for a contribution to the lunch on the fieldtrip and payment for the cruise, which includes a buffet and drinks.

Registrations are now open. We look forward to seeing you beside the Victoria Falls known as Mosi-Oa-Tunya, in Livingstone, Zambia.

By Michael Watts, Moola Mutondo, Kenneth Maseka and Godfrey Sakala

Chair of organising committee

Prof. Kenneth Maseka, Copperbelt University

Organising committee

Dr Michael Watts, British Geological Survey

Dr Moola Mutondo, Copperbelt University

Dr Godfrey Sakala, Zambia Agriculture Research Institute


 

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