SEGH Events

34th SEGH International Conference: Geochemistry for Sustainable Development

02 July 2018
Victoria Falls, Zambia
Geochemistry for Sustainable Development

The 34th SEGH International Conference on Geochemistry for Sustainable Development will take place at AVANI Victoria Falls Resort, Livingstone, Zambia, 2-7th July 2018

These are exciting times for African development across many sectors, including rapid technological advancement in I.T. and communications, Agriculture, Public Health, Mining and infrastructure development, alongside rapid urbanisation.  The scientific fields represented by SEGH are presented with challenges/opportunities to provide scientific information to the general public, government, industry and donor stakeholders.  The 34th SEGH International Conference theme is therefore organised around four topics under the banner of ‘Geochemistry for Sustainable Development’:

Theme 1. Industrial and Urban Development

Theme 2. Agriculture

Theme 3. Health

Theme 4. Technologies

Registrations are now open. We cordially invite SEGH members and new friends to join the SEGH 2018 conference next to Victoria Falls in Livingstone, Zambia. Please view the conference website for details .


Chair of organising committee

Prof. Kenneth Maseka, Copperbelt University -

Organising committee

Dr Michael Watts, British Geological Survey -

Dr Moola Mutondo, Copperbelt University -

Dr Godfrey Sakala, Zambia Agriculture Research Institute -


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Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Erratum to: Preliminary assessment of surface soil lead concentrations in Melbourne, Australia 2018-04-01
  • In vivo uptake of iodine from a Fucus serratus Linnaeus seaweed bath: does volatile iodine contribute? 2018-04-01


    Seaweed baths containing Fucus serratus Linnaeus are a rich source of iodine which has the potential to increase the urinary iodide concentration (UIC) of the bather. In this study, the range of total iodine concentration in seawater (22–105 µg L−1) and seaweed baths (808–13,734 µg L−1) was measured over 1 year. The seasonal trend shows minimum levels in summer (May–July) and maximum in winter (November–January). The bathwater pH was found to be acidic, average pH 5.9 ± 0.3. An in vivo study with 30 volunteers was undertaken to measure the UIC of 15 bathers immersed in the bath and 15 non-bathers sitting adjacent to the bath. Their UIC was analysed pre- and post-seaweed bath and corrected for creatinine concentration. The corrected UIC of the population shows an increase following the seaweed bath from a pre-treatment median of 76 µg L−1 to a post-treatment median of 95 µg L−1. The pre-treatment UIC for both groups did not indicate significant difference (p = 0.479); however, the post-treatment UIC for both did (p = 0.015) where the median bather test UIC was 86 µg L−1 and the non-bather UIC test was 105 µg L−1. Results indicate the bath has the potential to increase the UIC by a significant amount and that inhalation of volatile iodine is a more significant contributor to UIC than previously documented.

  • 2017 Outstanding Reviewers 2018-04-01