• SEGH

    Impactful scientific research

  • SEGH

    Water sampling, Argentina 

  • SEGH

    SEGH 2018 Vic Falls conference delegates

  • SEGH

    Earth's resources have huge economic importance, with widespread environmental impacts

  • SEGH

    Studying agricultural practices is vital in communities reliant on subsistence farming

  • SEGH

    Considering a range of environmental media: air pollution is a growing concern globally

  • SEGH

    Best practice environmental sampling and monitoring to achieve optimal data

  • SEGH

    How does extracting the Earth's natural resources impact the environment?

  • SEGH

    Annual international conferences

  • SEGH

    Diverse scientific fields and multidisciplinary expertise brought together within an international community

  • SEGH

    SEGH 2018 Victoria Falls, Zambia

Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health

SEGH was established in 1971 to provide a forum for scientists from various disciplines to work together in understanding the interaction between the geochemical environment and the health of plants, animals, and humans. We recognise the importance of interdisciplinary research. SEGH members represent expertise in a diverse range of scientific fields, such as biology, engineering, geology, hydrology, epidemiology, chemistry, medicine, nutrition, and toxicology.

 

Stay informed of new impact factor journal issues! Sign up for the Table of Contents Alert here 

Follow updates on 

Twitter @SocEGH

Facebook @SocEGH

SEGH Articles

A human health risk assessment framework to improve the management of potentially toxic elements in informally recycled waste electronic and electrical equipment (WEEE)

| February 2019

Dr Alessandra Cesaro, University of Salerno and Professor Andrew Hursthouse, University of the West of Scotland assess the human health risk of potentially toxic elements in informally recycled waste electronic and electrical equipment (WEEE)  continue reading...

Chronic cadmium exposure promotes nasopharyngeal carcinoma progression and radioresistance

| January 2019

Dr Lin Peng and her team investigate how environmental pollutant exposure influences the risk of cancer development and therapeutic resistance at the Clinical Laboratory, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, China.  continue reading...

35th International Conference on Environmental Geochemistry and Health

| November 2018

The 35th International Conference on Environmental Geochemistry and Health will be organized by Drs Sanja Potgieter-Vermaak and David Megson at Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK between the 1st and 5th of July 2019.  continue reading...

Keep up to date

Submit Content

Members can keep in touch with their colleagues through short news and events articles of interest to the SEGH community.

Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • The society for environmental Geochemistry and health (SEGH): a retrospect 2019-02-22
  • Air quality and PM 10 -associated poly-aromatic hydrocarbons around the railway traffic area: statistical and air mass trajectory approaches 2019-02-19

    Abstract

    Diesel engine railway traffic causes atmosphere pollution due to the exhaust emission which may be harmful to the passengers as well as workers. In this study, the air quality and PM10 concentrations were evaluated around a railway station in Northeast India where trains are operated with diesel engines. The gaseous pollutant (e.g. SO2, NO2, and NH3) was collected and measured by using ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy. The advanced level characterizations of the PM10 samples were carried out by using ion chromatography, Fourier-transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry , X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectroscopy techniques to know their possible environmental contaminants. High-performance liquid chromatography technique was used to determine the concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to estimate the possible atmospheric pollution level caused by the rail traffic in the enclosure. The average PM10 concentration was found to be 262.11 µg m−3 (maximum 24 hour) which indicates poor air quality (AQI category) around the rail traffic. The statistical and air mass trajectory analysis was also done to know their mutual correlation and source apportionment. This study will modify traditional studies where only models are used to simulate the origins.

  • The geochemistry of geophagic material consumed in Onangama Village, Northern Namibia: a potential health hazard for pregnant women in the area 2019-02-18

    Abstract

    Ingestion of geophagic materials might affect human health and induce diseases by different ways. The purpose of this study is to determine the geochemical composition of geophagic material consumed especially by pregnant women in Onangama Village, Northern Namibia and to assess its possible health effects. X-ray fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry were used in order to determine the major, and trace elements as well as anions concentrations of the consumed material. The geochemical analysis revealed high concentrations of aluminium (Al), calcium (Ca), iron (Fe), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), potassium (K), sodium (Na), and silica (Si); and trace elements including arsenic (As), chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni) and vanadium (V) as well as sulphate (SO42−), nitrate (NO3), and nitrite (NO2) anions comparing to the recommended daily allowance for pregnant women. The pH for some of the studied samples is alkaline, which might increase the gastrointestinal tract pH (pH < 2) and cause a decrease in the bioavailability of elements. The calculated health risk index (HRI > 1) revealed that Al and Mn might be a potential risk for human consumption. Based on the results obtained from the geochemical analysis, the consumption of the studied material might present a potential health risk to pregnant women including concomitant detrimental maternal and foetal effects.